Vintage mtg ban list

Vintage mtg ban list DEFAULT

The May 18 Banned and Restricted List Update has arrived and with it, some Companions are leaving Vintage and Legacy. The following changes are effective May 18 for tabletop and Magic Online play, and May 21 for MTG Arena play.

Lurrus of the Dream Den is banned in Vintage.

Lurrus of the Dream Den and Zirda, the Dawnmaker are banned in Legacy.

Drannith Magistrate and Winota, Joiner of Forces are banned in Brawl.

The headliner here is the ban of Lurrus in Vintage. Vintage is a format where cards are rarely banned for power level reasons and instead they are restricted to only one copy per deck. Given that a spot on the restricted list would have no impact on Lurrus’ viability, the decision was made to ban the creature outright.

In Legacy, the dominance of Lurrus decks necessitated a change. Lurrus’ deckbuilding condition was not a huge hurdle and decks packing the Companion were winning around 55% of their Magic Online matches. Zirda combo decks focused on Grim Monolith and generating an unbound amount of mana, were seen as the heir apparent to Lurrus decks and as such the Boros Companion was banned before it could take over the format.

In Brawl, Drannith Magistrate was banned as it runs contrary to the philosophy of allowing players to cast their Commander. Winota was banned due to the its increased prevalence in the format as well as the repetitive nature of the deck.

The May 18 announcement concluded with a note regarding Modern, Pioneer, and Standard. These formats are being watched for issues regarding the consistency of certain Companion decks, as well as those decks’ potential dominance. Wizards wants to see the metagame drift towards an “equilibrium state” before taking addition steps. While there was no promise of future action, it was implied that if problems continue in these formats, steps would be taken to solve them.

Tags: #MTGNews, Brawl, Legacy, Lurrus of the Dream Den, Vintage, Zirda the Dawnmaker

Sours: https://strategy.channelfireball.com/all-strategy/mtg/channelmagic-articles/may-18-banned-and-restricted-list-update/

Vintage, originally known as Type 1 or Type I, is an eternal format that allows for the use of almost all printed cards, save cards with silver borders (like Un-sets) and/or having a non-Standard Magic back (other than Double-Faced Card/Meld Card), as well as certain cards banned for causing problems in sanctioned tournaments.[1] Additionally, a number of cards are restricted to a maximum of one copy between a player's deck and sideboard due to their power. These include the Power Nine, which are not allowed in any other tournament format. The deck-building rules common to all Constructed formats apply in Vintage.

History[]

Vintage dates its existence to the 1995 separation of sanctioned constructed tournaments into "Type I" and "Type II" (the latter is now called Standard). It was sometimes called 'Classic' (a name later used for the Sixth EditionCore Set in 1999 [2] and a similar constructed format in Magic Online) from 1997 until 2000, when the name Vintage was formally endorsed at the Magic Invitational. Vintage's restricted list was used as the banned list for a format called "Type 1.5" or "Classic-Restricted". In September 2004, the two lists were uncoupled, and Type 1.5's new banned list became the basis of the renamed format of Legacy. Vintage debuted in Magic Online concurrent with the release of the Vintage Masters digital compilation set in 2014, replacing Classic.

Deck construction[]

Constructed decks must contain a minimum of sixty cards. There is no maximum deck size; however, you must be able to shuffle your deck with no assistance. If a player wishes to use a sideboard, it must contain no more than fifteen cards.

With the exception of basic land cards, a player's combined deck and sideboard may not contain more than four of any individual card, counted by its English card title equivalent.

Banned cards[]

The following cards are banned in Vintage tournaments:

Restricted cards[]

The following cards are restricted in Vintage tournaments as of November 19, 2019:

Formerly Restricted cards[]

See also: Timeline of DCI bans and restrictions.

The following is a list of cards that are currently not restricted in the format but have been restricted at one point previously. This list only concerns about cards unrestricted after September 2004 when Vintage and Legacy restrictions were separated. For reasons behind the restrictions and a list of previously restricted cards see: Restricted cards.

Archetypes[]

Major archetypes include:

References[]

External links[]

Sours: https://mtg.fandom.com/wiki/Vintage
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sushiske29 days agoDeckbuilding, Historic, Modern, Pauper, Pioneer, Standard, Vintage

Last updated on October 7, 2021

Dark Heart of the Wood | Illustration by Mark Tedin

Dark Heart of the Wood | Illustration by Mark Tedin

The “Banned and Restricted” announcements for MTG are pretty polarizing within the community. An important part of the formation and maintenance of constructed formats, it’s a huge part of the Magic ecosystem and has a lot of chatter around it.

But what is it? Why is it? Where is it? Who is it? Who am I? Who keeps eating my cereal at night?

These are all important questions that you’ll find the answer to both here, and at the back end of a breakfast-related existential crisis. So, let’s just do it here instead! Nobody needs to know about the cereal.

This is going to be super long, so buckle up and get ready for what is probably the most comprehensive thing you’ll ever read on the history of banlist discussions! That’s the goal, at least.

In the words of a 90s icon, much like Magic itself, lets-a-go!

Or. even better: Wah!

Waluigi

The Latest B&R Announcement

If you’re just here for the latest announcement, here it is!

Effective Date: September 24, 2021

Standard

Banned

Omnath, Locus of Creation

Why Are Cards Banned?

Work a Double

Work a Double | Illustration by Carl Frank

Some cards are bad for the ecosystem of a format, some cards are egregious in their power levels, and some cards are just disliked by WotC.

Wizards has a ban philosophy, which you can try to figure out by scouring articles all over the internet and ending up down a hole of design philosophy, old formats, and eating ice cream at 4 am wondering what it all means.

But I did all of that work for you! On a blanket level, Wizards bans cards for one of reasons below:

  • Because they’re just egregiously powerful. Oko, Thief of Crowns, for example.
  • The card is too powerful for a specific format. Things like Wrenn and Six being banned in Legacy but not in Modern or the War of the Sparkplaneswalkers that are restricted in Vintage.
  • The card leads to “unfun” gameplay.
  • The card is too efficient.

It could also be the every-present fifth reason:

  • In the interest of competitive diversity.

The thing is, play design is hard. As seen recently with Oko, Thief of Crowns, one wrong stat can make a card absurdly powerful and there’s no way to patch or errata said mistake unlike in video games.

Wizards sometimes needs to innovate so they make new ideas that may be too strong for the game. Banned and restricted lists are filled with these card designs.

The cards need to go so they don’t end up overrunning the format. And sometimes newer strategies break older cards, so the older cards get banned while the newer cards still get sold. Honestly, I don’t see any correlation between new sets and wanting people to play with new cards, and profits and…

“Mom, I’m gonna have to take the ice cream again!”

But, seriously, we all make mistakes. And the banned and restricted articles are a great insight into why these cards are broken, and what they’ve done to their formats. Honestly, the day a new B&R article drops is like Christmas for some of us. Especially when the metagame turns into what it’s become recently. I don’t even need to name the format. You know.

I don’t particularly agree with all of these decisions, like the banning of my sweet, sweet Splinter Twin. But Wizards are experienced and they can be very right sometimes. They do also miss the mark sometimes, though. Faithless Looting was an issue for years and was only banned in 2019. But if we didn’t believe in the game we wouldn’t be here.

Who Does the Banning?

Omnath, Locus of Creation

Omnath, Locus of Creation | Illustration by Chris Rahn

For all of the official formats other than Commander, Wizards of the Coast bans the cards on their blog. Commander bans are made by the rules committee and are posted onto the official Commander rules committee website.

Any other format usually has its own committees or council to ban the cards.

Ban Announcement Dates

We have no clue.

None.

… Other than “Mondays.”

So, the Wizards banlist announcements used to give a date for the next announcement, but now we get an announcement a week. Sometimes even a day before? Whether this is good or bad, I don’t know. But sometimes we just get announcements saying, “There’s gonna be an announcement soon!” and go with it.

This means that cards are banned quicker but also that we have no preparation for these cards getting banned. We can still say that the cards are always banned on Mondays, though.

Official Banlists

Rules Lawyer

Rules Lawyer | Illustration by Dmitry Burmak

So, I think that’s it from me. Now, it’s time for me to spew a bunch of cards that are banned in formats for your pleasure.

I apologise, in advance, for the amount of spewing.

Especially in Standard.

(Blame Wizards)

Standard

The Standard format uses the most recently released Magic sets.

Modern

This format lets you dive deeper into Magic’s history, allowing cards from Eighth Edition to today.

Vintage

While Modern lets you play cards from as far back as 2003, Vintage lets you play cards from any set in the 20+ year history of Magic!

Banned

Restricted

The following cards are restricted, which means you can only have one of them in your main deck and sideboard combined:

Legacy

Allows cards from all legal sets but bans certain cards for power level reasons.

Commander

The following cards are banned from the format:

  • Cards with the Card Type “Conspiracy.”
  • Cards that reference “playing for ante.”
  • Cards whose art, text, name, or combination thereof are racially or culturally offensive.
  • Ancestral Recall
  • Balance
  • Biorhythm
  • Black Lotus
  • Braids, Cabal Minion
  • Chaos Orb
  • Coalition Victory
  • Channel
  • Emrakul, the Aeons Torn
  • Erayo, Soratami Ascendant
  • Falling Star
  • Fastbond
  • Flash
  • Gifts Ungiven
  • Golos, Tireless Pilgrim
  • Griselbrand
  • Hullbreacher
  • Iona, Shield of Emeria
  • Karakas
  • Leovold, Emissary of Trest
  • Library of Alexandria
  • Limited Resources
  • Lutri, the Spellchaser
  • Mox Emerald
  • Mox Jet
  • Mox Pearl
  • Mox Ruby
  • Mox Sapphire
  • Panoptic Mirror
  • Paradox Engine
  • Primeval Titan
  • Prophet of Kruphix
  • Recurring Nightmare
  • Rofellos, Llanowar Emissary
  • Shahrazad
  • Sundering Titan
  • Sway of the Stars
  • Sylvan Primordial
  • Time Vault
  • Time Walk
  • Tinker
  • Tolarian Academy
  • Trade Secrets
  • Upheaval
  • Yawgmoth’s Bargain

Block

These cards are banned in block-constructed tournaments, separated by block:

Innistrad-Avacyn Restored Block

Mirrodin Block

Masques Block

Urza Block

Tempest Block

Mirage Block

Ice Age Block

Brawl

The following cards are banned in Brawl and can’t be included in your deck or used as your commander:

Pauper

All cards in the Pauper format must have been printed at common rarity in a Magic set or product. Common promo cards are only legal if the card meets that qualification. If a common version of a particular card was ever released in Magic, any version of that card is legal in this format.

The following cards are banned in this format:

Pioneer

Pioneer is a new-ish nonrotating format featuring cards from Return to Ravnica and forward. The following cards are banned:

Historic

Suspended

Banned

Historic Brawl

Timeline of Bans in MTG

All right. Let’s take a look at the banlist update from July 2nd 2018 (before we started getting regular updates because of the turbulent nature of recent card design) to now.

September 24, 2021

Standard

September 13, 2021

Commander

September 8, 2021

Pauper

July 22, 2021

Historic

July 12, 2021

Commander

June 16, 2021

June 10, 2021

Historic

May 20, 2021

Historic

April 13, 2021

Historic

Historic Brawl

February 15, 2021

Historic

Pioneer

Modern

Legacy

Vintage

Cascade Rules Change

January 14, 2021

Pauper

October 12, 2020

Standard

Historic

Brawl

September 28, 2020

Standard

August 24, 2020

Historic

August 3, 2020

Standard

Pioneer

Historic

Brawl

July 13, 2020

Historic

Pioneer

Modern

Pauper

June 1, 2020

Standard

Historic

May 18, 2020

Brawl

Legacy

Vintage

April 13, 2020

Brawl

March 9, 2020

Brawl

Historic

Legacy

Modern

December 2, 2019

Pioneer

November 18, 2019

Standard

Brawl

Legacy

Vintage

November 11, 2019

Pioneer

November 4, 2019

Pioneer

October 21, 2019

Pioneer

Standard

Pauper

August 26, 2019

Standard

Modern

Vintage

July 8, 2019

Modern

June 27, 2019

Pauper

May 20, 2019

Pauper

January 21, 2019

Modern

July 2, 2018

Legacy

Banlist Trivia

The B&R list has lots of myth, trivia, and legend around it. For example, there have been more cards banned in Standard since 2017 than before 2017. This is absolutely insane, and I’m not going to keep going on about power creep, but it’s definitely a telling statistic.

Also, the artist with the most cards banned in any format is Mark Tedin, which is very interesting. He’s probably the most powerful Magic artist. It really makes you think about how many of the most iconic cards have been helmed by his art. Rob Alexander and Volkan Baga are tied for second with nine cards each.

Adieu

Finale of Revelation - Illustration by Johann Bodin

Finale of Revelation | Illustration by Johann Bodin

Well, that’s it from me today. I hope you enjoyed our time together. Do you have any opinions about the banlist, or any cool trivia? Did you like what you read? Let me know down below in the comments.

If you’re enjoying what we do, then feel free to become a member of our Patreon! It helps us continue making lengthy stuff filled with content and (in my case at least) prevent existential crises about the design philosophy of Wizards of the Coast. Just as an example.

Thank you for reading my compendium on bans, restrictions, cardboard, and ice cream, and I hope to see you again. Have a good one!

Block ConstructedLegacyModernMTGMTG banlistMTG banned and restrictedMTG banned cardsMTG BrawlMTG cardsMTG collectionMTG CommanderMTG FormatsMTG PauperMTG PioneerMTG restricted cardsStandardVintage

sushiske
Two Tarmogoyfs in a trenchcoat
Ays—or 'sushi' for those who'd like to call them so—has been playing Magic since 2017. Draftsim's connoisseur of memes—and the person responsible for those hilarious MTGGoldfish Video Intros a while back—can be frequently found slinging cards in Legacy, Modern and Penny Dreadful, or concocting their next plan for world (meme) domination.

Related Posts

Sours: https://draftsim.com/mtg-banned-list/
Fifteen Bans Across Four Formats And A Rules Change: The Most Impactful Banlist Update Of All Time!

This deck is not legal due to the following reasons:

  • Deck contains banned cards: ["Ancestral Recall", "Black Lotus", "Gifts Ungiven", "Leovold, Emissary of Trest", "Mox Emerald", "Mox Jet", "Mox Sapphire", "Time Vault", "Time Walk", "Tinker", "Tolarian Academy"].

The deck will be not publicly searchable until the above errors are fixed.

Format: Commander
User Submitted Deck
Deck Date: Apr 24, 2017

1 Leovold, Emissary of Trest $ 6.00
1 Birds of Paradise $ 12.25
1 Deathrite Shaman $ 7.99
1 Jace, Vryn's Prodigy $ 16.44
1 Laboratory Maniac $ 4.12
1 Trinket Mage $ 0.37
1 Tezzeret the Seeker $ 18.87
1 Pact of Negation $ 11.09
1 Ancestral Recall $ 5,825.00
1 Brainstorm $ 0.60
1 Chain of Vapor $ 8.53
1 Dark Ritual $ 0.71
1 Flusterstorm $ 31.82
1 Gitaxian Probe $ 2.12
1 High Tide $ 0.95
1 Imperial Seal $ 649.79
1 Mental Misstep $ 5.15
1 Mystical Tutor $ 21.49
1 Nature's Claim $ 0.95
1 Noxious Revival $ 12.63
1 Ponder $ 2.32
1 Preordain $ 0.63
1 Swan Song $ 12.49
1 Vampiric Tutor $ 49.00
1 Abrupt Decay $ 4.96
1 Cabal Ritual $ 5.99
1 Counterspell $ 1.25
1 Cyclonic Rift $ 30.00
1 Demonic Tutor $ 35.35
1 Hurkyl's Recall $ 4.17
1 Mana Drain $ 49.68
1 Merchant Scroll $ 6.38
1 Nature's Lore $ 4.61
1 Negate $ 0.24
1 Regrowth $ 0.50
1 Remand $ 4.05
1 Time Walk $ 3,200.00
1 Transmute Artifact $ 400.00
1 Doomsday $ 13.67
1 Frantic Search $ 1.25
1 Grim Tutor $ 16.96
1 Timetwister $ 9,299.00
1 Tinker $ 1.65
1 Toxic Deluge $ 21.23
1 Windfall $ 3.44
1 Yawgmoth's Will $ 285.00
1 Gifts Ungiven $ 1.87
1 Ad Nauseam $ 9.69
1 Force of Will $ 111.65
1 Gush $ 0.75
1 Misdirection $ 2.53
1 Time Spiral $ 199.99
1 Black Lotus $ 32,000.00
1 Chrome Mox $ 64.99
1 Lion's Eye Diamond $ 599.99
1 Lotus Petal $ 15.10
1 Mana Crypt $ 149.98
1 Mox Diamond $ 650.00
1 Mox Emerald $ 7,251.25
1 Mox Jet $ 6,999.99
1 Mox Opal $ 48.36
1 Mox Sapphire $ 8,359.99
1 Candelabra of Tawnos $ 2,000.00
1 Sol Ring $ 1.91
1 Voltaic Key $ 1.25
1 Dimir Signet $ 3.29
1 Helm of Awakening $ 4.50
1 Time Vault $ 1,829.99
1 Teferi's Puzzle Box $ 6.25
1 Carpet of Flowers $ 23.28
1 Mystic Remora $ 10.30
1 Sylvan Library $ 43.02
1 Necropotence
Sours: https://www.mtggoldfish.com/deck/625166

Mtg ban list vintage

The DCI announces bans and restrictions of cards for their sanctioned formats if they deemed necessary to do so. In normal cases, these announcements are made on Mondays and take effect within a few days.

Previously, such announcements used to be made in a scheduled basis (usually two to three months) with coherence of Standard legal sets and major tournaments like the Pro Tour[1][2].

The following is a list of these announcements and their changes in chronological order. Formats that are not mentioned have seen no changes made to them in the respective announcements.

1994[]

The concept of formats doesn't yet exist as of this time. Vintage (Type 1) and Standard (Type 2) will be introduced in 1995.

January 25th[]

Formation of the original DCI banned/restricted list.[3][4]Ali from Cairo, Ancestral Recall, Berserk, Black Lotus, Braingeyser, Dingus Egg, Gauntlet of Might, Icy Manipulator, Mox Emerald, Mox Jet, Mox Pearl, Mox Ruby, Mox Sapphire, Orcish Oriflamme, Rukh Egg, Sol Ring, Timetwister, Time Vault, and Time Walk are restricted ("Limited"). Ante cards and Shahrazad are banned.[5][6][7] Use of cards from any of the expansion sets (at that time Arabian Nights) are banned unless the referee consents to their use (this would later be changed to allowed "unless expressly disallowed by the head judge prior to the event").[8]

February 23rd[]

Orcish Oriflamme and Rukh Egg are unrestricted.[9]

March 23rd[]

Channel, Copy Artifact, Demonic Tutor, Regrowth, and Wheel of Fortune are restricted. Icy Manipulator is unrestricted. Time Vault is banned.[9]

May[]

Candelabra of Tawnos, Feldon's Cane, Ivory Tower, and Library of Alexandria are restricted. Dingus Egg and Gauntlet of Might are unrestricted.[9]

June 13th[]

Mishra's Workshop is restricted.[9]

August[]

Chaos Orb, Falling Star, Mind Twist, Mirror Universe, Recall, Sword of the Ages, Underworld Dreams are restricted. For flavor reasons, all legendary cards (of type "Summon Legends"—then called Legends—or "Legendary Land") were restricted. Divine Intervention is banned.[10]

October 10th[]

Maze of Ith is restricted.[9]

1995[]

Creation of Standard (then called "Type 2") on January 10, inheriting banned and restricted lists from Vintage. Legal standard expansions are then the most current basic set (Revised Edition at the time) and the latest two Magic expansions only (The Dark and Fallen Empires). Unlike in Vintage, the head judge cannot ban cards from any such legal expansion.[11]

April 19th[]

October[]

November[]

1996[]

February[]

April[]

Card Errata[]

  • Time Vault now adds a time counter to itself when a turn is skipped for its cost. Taking an extra turn requires the removal of a time counter.

May[]

Legacy is created (then called Type 1.5). "Type 1.5 tournament decks may be constructed from Magic: The Gathering cards from the Limited (first edition, with black border) series, the Unlimited (second edition), Revised (third edition), Fourth Edition, any other Magic: The Gathering expansion (unless expressly disallowed by the head judge prior to the event), and promotional cards released by Wizards of the Coast in magazines or through books." There are no restricted cards. The list of banned cards is the sum of all cards that are either restricted or banned in Vintage or Standard.[16]

July[]

October[]

1997[]

January[]

  • Standard: New deck construction rules. New editions of the basic set replace old versions and are permitted in Standard play thirty days after the release date of the new edition. New standalone expansions (e.g., Ice Age, Mirage, etc.) replace previous stand-alone expansions and are permitted in Standard play thirty days after the release date of the new edition. Limited-edition expansions are replaced thirty days after the release date of the next limited-edition expansion which has a release date of more than 10 months later than the release date of the outgoing limited-edition expansion.[19]
  • Standard: All cards on the restricted list are moved to the banned list.[20]

May[]

June[]

July[]

  • Standard: New deck construction rules. Standard decks can be composed of cards from the most recent edition of Magic: The Gathering (then Fifth Edition) and all sets from the two most recent "blocks" of expansions (at the time the Ice Age block which originally contained Homelands instead of Coldsnap, and the Mirage block).[22]
  • Extended: Extended, announced in May, is now officially sanctioned.[23] Initial banned list includes all cards from Limited Edition, Unlimited Edition, Arabian Nights, Antiquities, and Legends which have not been reprinted in a more recent set, plus ante cards, and additionally: Demonic Tutor, Balance, Fastbond, Regrowth, Black Vise, Ivory Tower, Serendib Efreet, Braingeyser, Sol Ring, Juggernaut, Strip Mine, Channel, Kird Ape, Mana Crypt, Maze of Ith, Wheel of Fortune, Mind Twist, and Zuran Orb are banned.[24]
  • Vintage: Black Vise is restricted.
  • Mirage block: Squandered Resources is banned.[9]

October[]

1998[]

January[]

July[]

December[]

1999[]

March[]

  • Standard: Dream Halls, Earthcraft, Fluctuator, Lotus Petal, Recurring Nightmare, and Time Spiral are banned. Memory Jar is banned retroactively in mid March.
  • Extended: Memory Jar is banned. This was retroactively added to the March 1st bannings as an emergency ban in mid March.[26][27]
  • Urza's block Constructed: Time Spiral, Memory Jar, and Windfall are banned.
  • Legacy: Candelabra of Tawnos, Copy Artifact, Maze of Ith, Zuran Orb, and Mishra's Workshop are unbanned.
  • Vintage: Maze of Ith is unrestricted. Memory Jar is restricted.[28]

June[]

Card Errata[]

  • The errata issued for the “free” creatures (“When <this permanent> comes into play, if you played it from your hand, …”) applies to two additional cards: Karmic Guide and Treachery.

August 1st[]

Card Errata[]

  • Iridescent Drake receives the same erratum as the "free" creatures. It should read, "When Iridescent Drake comes into play, if you played it from your hand, return target enchant creature card from a graveyard to play enchanting Iridescent Drake. (You control that enchantment.)"
  • Lion's Eye Diamond should read, "Sacrifice Lion's Eye Diamond, Discard your hand: Add three mana of any one color to your mana pool. Play this ability as an instant." This erratum causes Lion's Eye Diamond to function as it did under Fifth Edition rules.
  • Lotus Vale should read, "When Lotus Vale comes into play, you may sacrifice two untapped lands. If you don't, sacrifice Lotus Vale. If you do, Lotus Vale gains '{T}: Add three mana of any one color to your mana pool.'" This erratum causes Lotus Vale to function as it did under Fifth Edition rules; you can't tap it for mana without first sacrificing two untapped lands.
  • Scorched Ruins should read, "When Scorched Ruins comes into play, you may sacrifice two untapped lands. If you don't, sacrifice Scorched Ruins. If you do, Scorched Ruins gains '{T}: Add four colorless mana to your mana pool.'" This erratum causes Scorched Ruins to function as it did under Fifth Edition rules; you can't tap it for mana without first sacrificing two untapped lands.

September[]

  • Extended: Dream Halls, Earthcraft, Lotus Petal, Mind Over Matter, and Yawgmoth's Will are banned.
  • Vintage: Divine Intervention and Shahrazad are unbanned.
    • Ivory Tower, Mirror Universe, and Underworld Dreams are unrestricted.
    • Crop Rotation, Doomsday, Dream Halls, Enlightened Tutor, Frantic Search, Grim Monolith, Hurkyl's Recall, Lotus Petal, Mana Crypt, Mana Vault, Mind Over Matter, Mox Diamond, Mystical Tutor, Tinker, Vampiric Tutor, Voltaic Key, Yawgmoth's Bargain, and Yawgmoth's Will are restricted.
  • Legacy: Divine Intervention, Ivory Tower, Mirror Universe, Shahrazad, and Underworld Dreams are unbanned.
    • Crop Rotation, Doomsday, Dream Halls, Enlightened Tutor, Frantic Search, Grim Monolith, Hurkyl's Recall, Lotus Petal, Mana Crypt, Mana Vault, Mind Over Matter, Mox Diamond, Mystical Tutor, Tinker, Vampiric Tutor, Voltaic Key, Yawgmoth's Bargain, and Yawgmoth's Will are banned.[31]

2000[]

March[]

June[]

September[]

2001[]

March[]

December[]

2002[]

No changes were made during the year.

2003[]

March[]

June[]

September[]

December[]

  • Extended: Goblin Recruiter, Grim Monolith, Tinker, Hermit Druid, Ancient Tomb, and Oath of Druids are banned.
  • Vintage: Burning Wish, Chrome Mox, and Lion's Eye Diamond are restricted.
  • Legacy: Burning Wish, Chrome Mox, and Lion's Eye Diamond are banned.[40]

2004[]

June[]

September[]

  • Extended: Metalworker and Skullclamp are banned.
  • Vintage: Braingeyser, Doomsday, Earthcraft, and Fork are unrestricted.
  • Legacy: Format becomes independent of Vintage.[42] Cards that were already banned in Type 1.5 continue to be banned in Legacy, with the following exceptions:
    • Unbanned : Braingeyser, Burning Wish, Chrome Mox, Crop Rotation, Doomsday, Enlightened Tutor, Fact or Fiction, Fork, Lion's Eye Diamond, Lotus Petal, Mox Diamond, Mystical Tutor, Regrowth, Stroke of Genius, and Voltaic Key.
    • Added to the banned list : Bazaar of Baghdad, Goblin Recruiter, Hermit Druid, Illusionary Mask, Land Tax, Mana Drain, Metalworker, Mishra's Workshop, Oath of Druids, Replenish, Skullclamp, and Worldgorger Dragon.

December[]

2005[]

March[]

June[]

September[]

Sours: https://mtg.fandom.com/wiki/Banned_and_restricted_cards/Timeline
Vintage League (170): Oops! All Spells (9/8/21)

Cards from expansions and special sets (like From the Vault, Magic: The Gathering—Commander, Duel Decks, Conspiracy, etc.) are legal in the Vintage format on the date of release of the expansion or special set.

Vintage is a constructed format and therefore adheres to the following constructed rules:

  • Minimum of sixty cards
  • No maximum deck size, as long as you can shuffle your deck unassisted
  • Up to fifteen cards in your sideboard, if used

 

With the exception of basic lands (Plains, Island, Swamp, Mountain, and Forest), your combined deck and sideboard may not contain more than four of any individual card, counted by its English card title equivalent.

Note: The five snow-covered lands from the Ice Age block—Snow-Covered Plains, Snow-Covered Island, Snow-Covered Swamp, Snow-Covered Mountain, and Snow-Covered Forest—are also basic lands. Snow-covered lands are only permitted in formats that allow expansions from the Ice Age block.

Sours: https://magic.wizards.com/en/game-info/gameplay/formats/vintage

Similar news:

Banned Cards

If a card appears on the banned list for your chosen format, then you may not include that card in your deck or sideboard. Doing so makes your deck illegal to play in any sanctioned tournaments for that format.

Cards are usually banned from play if they enable a deck or play style that heavily skews the play environment. What does that mean? If the card were legal, a competitive player either must be playing it, or must be specifically targeting it with his or her own strategies.

Some cards are banned because they have proven to simply be too powerful in their respective format. While hundreds of hours are spent rigorously playtesting sets before their release, the complexity of Magic makes it nearly impossible to accurately predict all the ways the new cards interact with older ones.

Cards whose art, text, name, or combination thereof that are racially or culturally offensive are banned in all formats. This list is a work in progress. Click here for the list.

Restricted Cards

If you wish to use a card that’s on the restricted list for your chosen format, you may include only a single copy of that card, counting both your main deck and your sideboard. Currently, only the Vintage format uses a restricted list.

Sours: https://magic.wizards.com/en/game-info/gameplay/rules-and-formats/banned-restricted


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