Av receiver buying guide 2015

Av receiver buying guide 2015 DEFAULT

Best AV receivers 2021: brilliant home cinema amplifiers

Best AV receivers Buying Guide: Welcome to What Hi-Fi?'s round-up of the best home cinema amplifiers you can buy in 2021.

If you're serious about home cinema then there really is no substitute for a set of surround sound speakers powered by an AV receiver.

The home cinema amplifier is the brains and brawn of any home cinema system and will ensure your TV and films sound powerful, detailed and dynamic and truly give you that immersive experience.

The majority of AV receivers now include Dolby Atmos and DTS:X support for adding even more sound channels, with the addition of height channel speakers, or they can, of course, play vanilla 5.1 surround sound. Expect HDMI inputs that can pass through 4K (and even 8K) and HDR video, with voice assistant support, Bluetooth wireless audio and Apple AirPlay extras on a fair number of models these days. 

But most of all, the best AV receivers deliver brilliant, room-filling sound. And these are our pick of them, all tried, tested and star-rated in our dedicated testing rooms.

1. Denon AVC-X3700H

Denon raises the bar again for what is achievable for less than a grand.

Specifications

Video support: 8K HDR

Surround formats: Dolby Atmos, DTS:X, IMAX Enhanced

HDMI inputs: 7

Hi-res audio: 24-bit/192kHz & DSD

Bluetooth: Yes

Streaming services: Spotify, Tidal. Qobuz, AirPlay, YouTube

Audio channels: 9.2

Dimensions: 17 x 43 x 38cm (HxWxD)

Reasons to buy

+Wonderfully clear and detailed+Dynamic and engaging+HDMI 2.1 and 8K

Reasons to avoid

-Nothing at this price

When you listen to class-leading products as often as we do, you know immediately when a new standard has been set. That said, sometimes it takes until you have a direct comparison with another superb product to comprehend just how high the bar has been lifted.

That is the case with the new 8K-ready Denon AVC-X3700H home cinema amplifier. While there may be a small part of us that would delight in the Japanese company messing up one of these amps – purely so we would have something different to write – the sonic improvement it has made on its predecessor is quite surprisingly marked, which is why its retained its What Hi-Fi? Award in 2021.

The energy of the performance is immediately striking. There’s greater muscle than before, but it is also even lither and better defined. It’s a combination of solid dynamic expression, which enthuses each vocal line as much as differentiating one gunshot from another, a sharper punch and greater clarity that allows you to get deeper inside the soundtrack and become more immersed.

If you have the system to match it with, the AVC-X3700H is another Denon effort that will happily last you many years.

Read the full review: Denon AVC-X3700H

2. JBL Synthesis SDR-35

JBL’s classy SDR-35 is a clear cut above the AVR norm

Specifications

Video support: 4K HDR

Surround formats: Dolby Atmos, Atmos Height Virtualization, DTS:X, DTS Virtual:X, Auro 3D, IMAX Enhanced

HDMI inputs: 7

High res audio: 24Bit / 192kHz

Bluetooth: Yes

Streaming Services: Chromecast, AirPlay 2, aptX HD Bluetooth, Roon Ready

Dimensions: 171 x 433 x 425 x mm (H x W x D)

Reasons to buy

+Supremely clean, clear sound+Thrilling mix of subtlety and scale+Substantial format support

Reasons to avoid

-Only seven channels of power-HDMI 2.1 upgrade will cost extra

When hunting for an AV receiver or amplifier, it can be hard not to get caught up in the battle of the tech specs and those who become too focused on comparing spec sheets may well overlook the 2021 What Hi-Fi? Award-winning JBL Synthesis SDR-35.

While its format support is thorough, its amplification for just seven channels and current lack of HDMI 2.1 connections (all of the sockets are 18gbps HDMI 2.0s but a hardware upgrade to HDMI 2.1 will be offered towards the end of 2021) are trumped by Denon receivers costing around a sixth of its price tag.

In terms of sound quality though, this JBL is in a whole different league, delivering music and movies with a truly rare maturity and sophistication and if we were building a high-end home cinema from scratch, it would be the first component on the shortlist.

The range of supported HDR types is exemplary, with HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision and HDR10+ all offered on the video side, and Dolby Atmos, DTS:X, Auro 3D and even IMAX Enhanced for audio. There's also Dolby Height Virtualisation and DTS Virtual:X on board for those who want to simulate height effects without the use of physical ceiling or up-firing speakers.

As well as a substantial selection of physical connections, there are plenty of ways to wirelessly get your content to the SDR-35 too with aptX HD Bluetooth, Apple AirPlay 2 and Google Chromecast on board. It also works with Harman’s MusicLife app, which allows for streaming of music from the likes of Tidal, Deezer and Qobuz, plus tracks stored on your own network.

Read the full review: JBL Synthesis SDR-35

3. Denon AVC-X6700H

A powerful amp that was worth the wait.

Specifications

Power output: 205W

Channels: 11.2

Video support: 8K HDR

Surround formats: Dolby Atmos, DTS:X, IMAX Enhanced

HDMI inputs: 8

Wi-fi: Yes

Bluetooth: Yes

Dimensions: 17 x 43 x 38cm (HxWxD)

Reasons to buy

+Impressive scale and authority+Improved detail and expression+8K support

Reasons to avoid

-Some may want to dial back bass

When hunting for an AV receiver or amplifier, it can be hard not to get caught up in the battle of the tech specs and those who become too focused on comparing spec sheets may well overlook the 2021 What Hi-Fi? Award-inning JBL Synthesis SDR-35.

While its format support is thorough, its amplification for just seven channels and current lack of HDMI 2.1 connections (all of the sockets are 18gbps HDMI 2.0s but a hardware upgrade to HDMI 2.1 will be offered towards the end of 2021) are trumped by Denon receivers costing around a sixth of its price tag.

In terms of sound quality though, this JBL is in a whole different league, delivering music and movies with a truly rare maturity and sophistication and if we were building a high-end home cinema from scratch, it would be the first component on the shortlist.

The range of supported HDR types is exemplary, with HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision and HDR10+ all offered on the video side, and Dolby Atmos, DTS:X, Auro 3D and even IMAX Enhanced for audio. There's also Dolby Height Virtualisation and DTS Virtual:X on board for those who want to simulate height effects without the use of physical ceiling or up-firing speakers.

As well as a substantial selection of physical connections, there are plenty of ways to wirelessly get your content to the SDR-35 too with aptX HD Bluetooth, Apple AirPlay 2 and Google Chromecast on board. It also works with Harman’s MusicLife app, which allows for streaming of music from the likes of Tidal, Deezer and Qobuz, plus tracks stored on your own network.

Read the full review: JBL Synthesis SDR-35

4. Sony STR-DN1080

Best AV receiver in its class. A superb piece of kit for the money.

Specifications

Video support: 4K HDR

Surround formats: Dolby Atmos & DTS:X

HDMI inputs: 6

Hi-res audio: 24-bit/192kHz & DSD

Bluetooth: Yes

Streaming services: Spotify, Tidal. Qobuz, AirPlay, YouTube

Audio channels: 7.2

Dimensions: 16 x 43 x 33cm (HxWxD)

Reasons to buy

+Punchy, agile and precise+Enjoyable and dynamic performance+Exhaustive features

Reasons to avoid

-A backlit remote would be nice

The fact that this was our Product of the Year for two years in a row – and picked up a fourth Award in 2020 – tells you all you need to know. This hugely talented AV receiver was best in class when we originally tested it and remains sensational value for money.

And as for the sound it makes... well, let's just say you'll have to spend an awful lot more cash to get better performance. The feature-packed Sony STR-DN1080 sounds fantastic, reaching deep into its reserves to deliver a performance packed with punch, dynamism and authority in a way we haven’t heard from home cinema amplifiers at this sort of price.

There's an incredible amount of detail from natural, expressive voices to layers of insight and depth surrounding each sound effect. Dynamically speaking, it's a fun and exciting listen, equally at home rendering tranquil, quiet moments as it is huge, wall-shuddering explosions - in a word, enthralling.

Sony has unfortunately discontinued the STR-DN1080 and it's now almost impossible to buy a new one in the UK. It's worth considering a second-hand unit, though, and there's still decent availability in the US – for now.

Read the full review: Sony STR-DN1080

5. Denon AVR-X2700H

Another entry-level AVR belter from Denon.

Specifications

Power output: 150W

Channels: 7.1

Video support: 8K HDR

Surround formats: Dolby Atmos, DTS:X, IMAX Enhanced

HDMI inputs: 7

Wi-fi: Yes

Bluetooth: Yes

Dimensions: 17 x 43 x 33cm (HxWxD)

Reasons to buy

+Superb spatial control+Excellent sense of rhythm+HDMI 2.1 and 8K

Reasons to avoid

-Nothing at this price

If we had to use one word to describe the sound of this receiver, it would be ‘confident’. The AVR-X2700H doesn’t try too hard to impress, as a nervously underpowered budget amp might. 

It’s bigger, better and more cultured than that. It has even greater authority than last year’s model, and it never strains to exert it. The two subwoofers in our 7.2 set-up growl with control whenever called upon, never once detracting from the crystal clarity of the music in the soundtrack, the voices or surround effects.

It’s an easy and effective listen. No matter how hectic the action becomes, this Denon never misses a beat. It passes the laser blasts from speaker to speaker in a wonderfully coherent manner and, no matter the scene, creates a genuine sense of place.

Read the full review: Denon AVR-X2700H

6. Denon AVR-X3600H

A former Award winner that still packs a punch.

Specifications

Power output: 180W

Channels: 9

Video support: 4K HDR

Surround formats: Dolby Atmos, DTS:X, Dolby Vision

HDMI inputs: 8

Wi-fi: Yes

Bluetooth: Yes

Dimensions: 17 x 44 x 3cm (HxWxD)

Reasons to buy

+Added amplification channels+More power than its predecessor+Gains worthwhile technologies

Reasons to avoid

-Nothing at this price

Sometimes the differences between generations of Denon home cinema can appear minor. But that wasn't the case with the AVR-X3600H.

Rather than merely updating the 2018 Award-winning AVR-X3500H, Denon added two amp channels and processing power for a further pair, upgraded power supply and power transformer and extruded aluminium heatsink.

Most importantly, though, it tightened up the sound to a truly impressive degree. Its predecessor had muscle, but this amp is even more clearly defined and at full fighting fitness.

It isn’t so much the fact that this is an altogether more powerful amplifier than the Award-winning AVR-X3500H – already a mighty receiver in its own right – but its muscle feels leaner, and punches tend to sting more.

Truly, this is a heavyweight in every sense of the word. That's why we named it our AV receiver Product of the Year for 2019. For pound-per-performance value, it's only beaten by its successor above.

Read the full review: Denon AVR-X3600H

7. Yamaha RX-A2A

An AV receiver with bold sound to match its bold looks

Specifications

HDR support: HDR10, Dolby Vision, HDR10+ (via future update)

Surround formats: Dolby Atmos, DTS:X, Dolby Atmos Height Virtualization

HDMI inputs: 7

High res audio: ALAC: up to 96 kHz / 24-bit, FLAC: up to 384 kHz / 24-bit, WAV / AIFF: up to 384 kHz / 32-bit

Bluetooth: Yes (SBC / AAC)

Streaming: MusicCast, AirPlay 2

WiFi: 2.4/5GHz

Dimensions: 17 x 44 x 37cm (HxWxD)

Reasons to buy

+Agile and responsive+Spacious but focused presentation+Exciting character

Reasons to avoid

-Lacks authority-HDMI 2.1 features require updates

Part of Yamaha's premium Aventage range, the RX-A2A is the beneficiary of a glossy aesthetic revamp as well as an injection of next-generation connectivity that will future proof it for the coming years.

With seven full-range channels of power, each rated at 100W into eight ohms in stereo conditions, plus two subwoofer outputs, the RX-A2A can handle up to 7.1 speaker configurations or, if using the supported Dolby Atmos and DTS:X decoding, a 5.1.2 set-up. 

Sonically it's impressive and incredibly responsive, delivering punchy transients, spacious surround sound and plenty of musical drive.

For streaming, there's Yamaha’s MusicCast app, which allows for high-res and lossless music formats including Apple Lossless (ALAC) up to 96kHz, WAV, FLAC or AIFF up to 192kHz as well as playback from services including Spotify and Tidal. There’s also AirPlay 2 and Bluetooth (SBC / AAC) on board and Google Assistant/Alexa compatibility for voice control, not to mention a DAB+ and FM/AM tuner.

There are several planned upgrades that Yamaha will make to the RX-A2A to get it up to full spec, but it will eventually support up to 4K at 120Hz (both with and without display screen compression) and 8K at 60Hz (with display screen compression) through three of its seven HDMI inputs. 

These features, along with other next-gen HDMI updates and HDR10+, will only become available thanks to a series of firmware updates beginning this Autumn. A free hardware upgrade will also be available to make it fully compatible with 4K at 120Hz signals from an Xbox Series X or Nvidia RTX30-series graphics card. 

But the lack of these features out of the box will probably only matter if you're a hardcore gamer. For films, the RX-A2A handles 4K signals at up to 60 frames per second, which no source currently goes beyond, and supports HDR10 and Dolby Vision video formats.

Read the full review: Yamaha RX-A2A

What Hi-Fi?, founded in 1976, is the world's leading independent guide to buying and owning hi-fi and home entertainment products. Our comprehensive tests help you buy the very best for your money, with our advice sections giving you step-by-step information on how to get even more from your music and movies. Everything is tested by our dedicated team of in-house reviewers in our custom-built test rooms in London and Bath. Our coveted five-star rating and Awards are recognised all over the world as the ultimate seal of approval, so you can buy with absolute confidence.

Read more about how we test

Sours: https://www.whathifi.com/best-buys/home-cinema/best-home-cinema-amplifiers

AV Receiver Buying Guide

buyers_guideAV receivers are one of the most significant consumer electronics components characteristically found in a home theater system. The primary purpose of AV receivers is to magnify sound from a massive amount of possible audio sources in addition to route video signs to the users’ TV from different sources. The user may configure and program a unit to get inputs from devices such as VCRs; DVD players etc. and merely select for which source she or he needs to route to their TV and include sound output.sirius-radio

This guide to choosing a receiver will get you the latest on some of the newer terms, expose some of the stipulation and rating numbers you will be looking at as you investigate, highlight some of the latest features and clarify what to look and listen in for when auditioning.

Stereo or Surround?

Two basic types of receivers exist A/V and Stereo. A/V (audio/video) receivers are planned to function as the center of a home theater. They construct on the stereo receiver idea by adding surround-sound capacity, digital video processing, digital audio processing and switching, mechanical speaker setup systems and more usually, network video and audio support.

A stereo receiver is intended to control two speakers at a time, sometimes in several rooms. Nowadays stereo receivers will often feature Sirius satellite radio capability or XM and HD radio tuners, as well as traditional AM/FM tuners. They generally offer a phono input and a few sorts of iPod combination available with the buy of an elective iPod dock. Subwoofer outputs can infrequently be established on stereo receivers, but are not familiar. Stereo receivers occasionally support digital audio or video inputs, supporting analog stereo instead.

Getting good sound

Nowadays AV receivers — yet the budget models — are crammed to the brim with all types of whistles and bells. With so many makes and models on the marketplace, you have to weed out the terrible units right off the bat. Or else, you just may go crazy trying to stay them all straight. To reform your short-list, you can start by appearing at some product qualifications to get a thought for what you want to expend your time auditioning. Specs, although, can be highly believed, as you will see.

avreceiver_sound

Power

This is where the majority of the trickery takes place. Producers know buyers are searching for large numbers, since more watts mean additional power and, consequently, better sound. So, they have figured out a way to attain the numbers that look fine to buyers by creation the tests less demanding.

power

Serious AV Receivers with video and audio performance that makes your entire home concert to life. Make all of your home theater by choosing the receiver that meets your needs today, and tomorrow.

 

Sours: https://www.mybestavreceiver.com/av-receiver-buying-guide/
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AV Receiver Buying Tips

Of all the components in your home theater system, none gets more playtime than your audio/video receiver. But buying an AVR can be daunting for home theater newbies or even seasoned enthusiasts diving back into the upgrade pool. AVR technology and features have been constantly moving targets these last few years. Here are some basics to help you make your selection, circa 2012.

A/V What?
An A/V receiver combines three audio components in one box. Primarily, it performs the traditional roles of a preamplifier and power amplifier. The sound for any home theater begins as a relatively low-level audio signal coming off a source component such as a cable box or disc player. These days, it’s more likely to be a digital audio signal than an analog signal. That signal gets converted between digital and analog as needed, manipulated to affect your volume adjustment, and might perhaps have some bass and treble contouring (or more sophisticated equalization) applied before it’s sent to the power amplifier, whose only job is to pump it up to the power level necessary to drive your speakers to sufficient volume.

Sours: https://www.soundandvision.com/category/av-receiver-buying-tips
How To Choose A Home Theater Receiver - A Buying Guide

Denon AV Receiver Buying Guide

Denon AVR-X3100W frontWhen it comes time to shop for a new AV receiver, it’s often difficult to know when to buy something new, and when to hold back while new models roll out. There’s nothing quite as frustrating as buying the “latest” AV receiver, only to have the replacement model come out next month—unless you got a close-out deal, that is. We’ve all done it. This Denon AV Receiver Buying Guide is designed to help you understand the best time to buy an AV receiver, and when to hold back. It does this by letting you know how long it’s been since the last model update. This way, if the receiver just came out or is in the middle of a product cycle, you know when to buy. But it also tells you when you may want to look for deals as new models ready for release and retailers are looking to blow through old inventory. For this, the Denon AV Receiver Buying Guide is your ticket to getting the best product and the best deal possible.

Current Denon E Series Receivers

Current Denon S Series Receivers

Current Denon X Series Receivers

[top-seller category_id=’21’ product_count=’4′ title=’Top Selling AV Receivers’]


Sours: https://avgadgets.com/denon-av-receiver-buying-guide/

Buying av guide 2015 receiver

There are some very important features you’re going to want in your new AV receiver so it will work with TVs made in recent years, and TVs soon to come, plus all your video devices (Apple TV, Roku, X-BOX, and so on).

4K & 4K Switching. 

4K is the current best-possible, highest resolution video format for consumer video at home. With 4K, the picture is so detailed, you can sit right in front of the TV with your nose almost touching the screen, and the picture still looks great. (No "dots and/or lines” like we all used to see on older sets. Even on the biggest 4K TVs.)

With the cost of larger screens coming down, and we mean WAY down, that’s really important. However, to make it all happen, your AV receiver needs to be capable of switching 4K signals. If it is, you can send both sound and picture from all your video sources through your sound system and enjoy live performance-sound without losing any detail in the video. 

Another feature to look out for: HDCP 2.2 support. HDCP 2.2 is the newest and latest copy-protection tech designed to stop people from illegally copying video content, particularly 4K content. Here's why it's important: If you try to watch an HDCP 2.2 copy-protected movie and your 4K Blu-ray player and/or AV receiver isn’t authorized to support HDCP 2.2 content, your screen will go black. Thankfully, all 4K TVs and receivers have at least one HDCP2.2 input.

Built-in Wi-Fi.

Ideally, everyone would hard-wire (physically plug in) their TV to their home network, but that's not always possible – especially if you live in an apartment and can't run wires through walls. That's where Wi-Fi saves the day, allowing all the smart functions new TVs have for streaming movies, watching YouTube, etc. to work wirelessly through your network. We're beginning to see Wi-Fi built into audio systems for the same reason, so you can, for instance, stream music without having to physically connect your sound system to your router.

DTS:X & HDR Formats.

DTS:X is a new surround sound format designed to make home theater audio more immersive, not unlike Dolby Atmos. (Remember the old Mac vs. PC war? Same thing. DTS:X and Dolby Atmos are fighting for market dominance, but Dolby Atmos remains today the preferred choice.) The good news: most new AV receivers can play both formats.

HDR stands for “High Dynamic Range.” It’s how and why today’s newest TVs are so spectacular when it comes to picture technology. HDR on a TV generates higher contrast within the existing pixels, expanding contrast and color so the end result is more accurate and has more depth. There are three versions of HDR, two of which are available now: HDR10 and DV (Dolby Vision), and one soon to come: HLG. Though HDR10 is currently the most widely used format (iTunes, Netflix, and VUDU among others), many consider Dolby Vision the better format for picture quality. However, with so many other contributing factors (what TV it’s on, how the content was mastered in post production, etc.), it’s hard to say which HDR format is truly best.

How is HDR relevant to receivers? By making sure the receiver you pick is equipped to handle all three formats (HDR10, DV, and HLG), you can help future-proof your system.

Sours: https://www.worldwidestereo.com/blogs/wws-underground/entries/how-to-choose-best-home-theater-receiver
AV Receiver Buying TIPS you NEED to know - How to CHOOSE \u0026 Features

Anthem 225 Integrated (Custom)

What You Should Know Before Selecting An Amplifier, Integrated Amplifier Or AV Receiver

The integrated amplifier or AV receiver is the heart of your stereo or home theatre system and also its control centre. It accepts inputs from a range of sources – computers, CD players, Blu-ray players, turntables, tuners, smart phones, tablets and DACs. It lets you choose which source to listen to. It amplifies that signal and feeds it to your speakers or possibly your headphones. It may even allow you to adjust the sound through bass and treble controls or a loudness contour. In most cases it will also come with a remote control so you don’t have to get up from your chair. Well that’s the job description. Are all amplifiers equally good at all these tasks?

You can’t tell everything from the spec sheets, but you can learn quite a lot. Sometimes it’s what isn’t shown in a spec sheet that can be the most revealing. Maybe there’s something to hide. In my day job I get a lot of applications from new graduates. Those with good transcripts usually attach them to their application. Those with poor marks will usually omit them.

It may surprise you to know that the difference between two amplifiers may be quite small on one set of speakers, but very significant with another pair. An amp can do well with one source, say CD, but perform poorly with another source, say vinyl. Let’s take a closer look at the spec sheets.

Unison Research Simply Italy

Tubes or Transistors
There are lots of very strongly held opinions in this field, just as in the analog / digital divide. In fact there are excellent valve amps and excellent tube amps, just as there are mediocre ones of both types. But the vast majority of amps are fully transistor based, since tube amps are often considered temperamental and high maintenance. Silicon amps usually achieve high reliability and can be left on at all times, whereas tube amps are often less efficient and tubes have a finite lifespan. Tubes can also go microphonic (a mechanical vibration), may need periodic bias adjustments and tube amps often have a higher level of hiss and hum than transistor amps. But many enthusiasts love the distinctive tube sound which encompasses a warm and present midrange and excels at both imaging and tonal quality. Owners of tube amps can re-tube their amps with higher quality tubes than the manufacturer supplies, thereby tweaking the sound to their own preferences. Look for talk about NOS (new old stock) tubes from Telefunken, GE, RCA, Westinghouse, etc. Transistors are often preferred for their wide bandwidth and low background noise.

In this article I will focus on transistor amps, but if you want more information about tube amps I can point you to the article “Tube Magic” by my colleague Malcolm J. Gomes in the 2012 Aug/Sept edition of CANADA HiFi.

Hybrid Amplifiers

Some manufacturers (such as Rogue Audio, Blue Circle Audio and Pathos Acoustics) offer a hybrid approach, whereby the preamp stage is tube based and the power amp stage is silicon based, which they claim gives you the best of both worlds.

Jeff Rowland continuum S2 front (Custom)

Integrated Amps or Receivers
An integrated amp is traditionally a two channel affair dedicated to the audio side of the equation. So it will have two channels of amplification, which will usually share a common power supply. A fine example is the Arcam FMJ A19. Some amps, like the NAD M3 have a dedicated power supply for each channel, and these are often described as dual-mono. This is an expensive feature, but allows each channel to operate more independently of the other, reducing cross-talk and improving fidelity.

A stereo receiver will add a tuner section to the mix. This used to be a very popular type of amplifier but is less commonly seen today in high quality components. Canada’s own Magnum Dynalab is one of the few companies offering a high end stereo receiver, the MD 209 Hybrid Audio Receiver.

An AV Receiver will allow you to play stereo or multichannel audio and will also be set up to support subwoofers and video switching. Don’t expect the same kind of audio fidelity you will find in dedicated stereo amplifiers unless you are willing to pay a lot of money. When you have to provide 5, 7 or more channels of amplification, that puts a lot of strain on the power supplies and many of these units are mass produced and designed to hit particular price points. But once again there are exceptions. Anthem, Krell and Bryston are among the companies who have not compromised quality when moving from 2 channel to multi channel, but they offer separate AV Preamps and Power amps rather than Integrated receivers. Marantz now offers its SR6007 Receiver supporting the new 4K video format and is a strong performer.

  • Sours: https://novo.press/a-complete-guide-to-choosing-an-amplifier-amplifier-buyer-guide-2015/

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