Nice cars 2016

Nice cars 2016 DEFAULT

When it's time to buy a teen driver a good used car, most parents want the safest, most reliable, and most affordable vehicle they can find. They want a vehicle that won't break down or break the bank, but it must provide adequate crash protection. Teenagers are, after all, among the nation's riskiest drivers, especially in Georgia.

To help you and your newly licensed driver find the safest and most reliable vehicle for less than $10,000, we've put together this list of 13 cars and SUVs that the data suggests will be your best bet. These vehicles performed well in crash testing executed by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Most have been awarded good or acceptable ratings in the IIHS driver-side small overlap front test, which replicates the front left corner of the vehicle hitting another vehicle or large object. These vehicles also have standard stability control, good ratings in four IIHS crashworthiness tests, above-average reliability (based on Consumer Reports member surveys), and four- or five-star overall safety ratings from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

Ford Taurus (2011 or 2014)

The Ford Taurus was discontinued in 2019 after sales lagged well behind its full-size sedan competitors, the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord. Despite the sixth-generation Taurus lasting nearly a decade without significant changes, there are a few model years and trims worth cherry picking. According to the IIHS, any 2013-or-newer Taurus had longer side-curtain airbags that improved protection in the event of a crash. However, although Taurus SHO models had HID projector headlamps, they scored just as poorly as the halogen projector lights on base SEL trims during IIHS headlight testing. If we were after a Taurus, we'd jump on the 365-hp twin-turbo all-wheel-drive Taurus SHO, but remember we're shopping for the kids on this one. To stay in the sub-$10,000 range, you'll need to shop for the 2014-or-older Taurus.

Honda Accord (2013 or newer)

We've been suggesting the Honda Accord to adults since many of them were kids. Since 1985, nine generations of Accord have won our 10Best trophy. It's been pretty dang popular too. In 2013, with 366,678 sales, the Accord was the second-best-selling car in the United States and set the bar for driving excellence at a reasonable price. We lived with a 2013 Accord Sport manual for 40,000 miles, and it was celebrated as a car several staffers would own. The 2013 Accord was offered as a coupe or a sedan, with either a 278-hp V-6 with a six-speed automatic transmission or a 185-hp four-cylinder with a six-speed manual or CVT. In any configuration, the Accord earned an IIHS Top Safety Pick+ rating.

Honda Civic (2012—2015)

No, the ninth-generation Honda Civic doesn’t have a cult-following like the high-revving coupes and hatchbacks for the 1990s, but it's far safer and better on gas than the Civics before it. Its base engine is a 140-hp inline-four with an EPA-estimated 39 mpg on the highway. And it's available with a manual gearbox, arguably the most important prerequisite for a high school diploma. It's relatively easy to score a sub-$10,000 Civic sedan with less than 100,000 miles on it, although most listings are for economical CVT-equipped models. For a more thrilling ride, try the 201-hp Civic Si, available only with a six-speed manual transmission. To keep the budget under $10,000, however, Civic Si listings will likely have more than 160,000 miles.

Hyundai Tucson (2012)

In 2012, we ranked the 176-hp all-wheel-drive Hyundai Tucson dead last in a six SUV comparison test. Our review of the Tucson, in summary: meh. But time has passed, the same Tucson can be had for less than $10,000, and, meh, it ain't so bad. And although we picked that particular Tucson last, it did have a few selling points versus the Ford Escape, Honda CR-V, and Mazda CX-5 of the time. Not only did the Tucson have the most front interior space at 55 cubic feet, it had the quietest idle, and the lowest top speed. So, even if it's not our first, second, or even fifth pick, it's not a bad choice for a kid just hitting the road.

Mazda 3 (2011 or newer)

There's an old saying that the best new cars make the best used cars, and this has been one of the best compacts for most of the past decade. The Mazda 3, which has always been available as a small sedan or hatchback, is not only safe, fuel efficient, and reliable, it's also a hoot to drive, with sharp handling, good power, and a fun, sporty disposition. These cars are also spacious for their size and have stylish, high-quality interiors. Prices start as low as $5000 for models from 2011 to 2013, but it's best to spend a little more if you can and get a 2014 or newer Mazda 3, which have higher safety ratings. They look better too and offer more interior space. They're so good that from 2014 to 2017 we selected the Mazda 3 for our 10Best Cars list.

Mazda CX-5 (2014 or newer)

Mazda's compact crossover, the CX-5, has only been around for two generations, and we've been fans since the beginning. The little SUV's first generation debuted in 2013 and ran until 2017, when the present design arrived. Both offer class-leading athleticism and driver enjoyment, well-crafted interiors, and smart styling. Even the older models still look good. The CX-5's design has always been more soccer player than soccer mom. In the second half of 2016, the crossover got a few updates such as a backup camera, touchscreen audio system, and a navigation system, which became standard on the Touring and Grand Touring trim levels. Some first-gen CX-5s were sold with a 2.0-liter four-cylinder and a five-speed manual transmission, but they are unicorns. Most have a 2.5-liter and an automatic. They aren't muscle cars, but they're quick enough. All-wheel drive was optional. Prices start at a little more than $8000.

Subaru Legacy or Outback (2013 or newer)

Also considered workhorses with impressive safety are Subaru's mid-size offerings, the Legacy sedan and the Outback, which is based on the Legacy but is part wagon and part crossover. Combine their sales and these have been among Subaru's best-selling models for the last decade. Both offer standard all-wheel drive, and the Outback has a higher riding suspension, which gives it more ground clearance for light off-roading. The fifth generation of the Legacy was sold through 2014, while its replacement was offered from 2015 to 2019. Most have a four-cylinder engine, but a more powerful six-cylinder was available. These Subarus also have a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT), which can feel different than a conventional automatic. Older Legacys start around $7500, and Outbacks usually cost about $1000 more.

Toyota Camry (2012 or newer)

The Toyota Camry is responsible for phrases like "old-man tan" and "50 shades of beige," but even as the butt of many jokes, it's been the best-selling car in the U.S. each year since 2002. The seventh-generation Camry won't match the fit and finish of a Volkswagen Passat or offer as much comfort as the Kia Optima, but where it does shine is its promise of an unobtrusive commute. A quiet throttle, ride, and strictly business looks is the formula. In fact, thanks to a 178-hp four-cylinder engine and better fuel economy, the seventh-generation Camry can go 65 miles farther on a tank of gas than today's Camry. Who's laughing now?

Toyota Highlander (2008 or newer)

The Toyota Highlander Hybrid was the most fuel-efficient SUV Toyota made at the time, earning just 1 mpg less in the city than the subcompact Toyota Matrix, according to the EPA. And yeah, you can easily find a 2008 Toyota Highlander Hybrid Limited, complete with all-wheel drive, heated leather seats, and navigation for less than $10,000 today, but it's going to have at least 200,000 miles on it. The rest of the 2008 Highlander models were powered by a 270-hp V-6 and were available in either front- or all-wheel drive. A 187-hp four-cylinder engine became available in 2009, and offered a 3 to 5 mpg improvement over V-6 models. If you're eager to empty the nest, it might be useful knowing Highlanders equipped with a towing package can pull up to 5000 pounds.

Toyota Prius (2011 or newer)

As folks who love the thrill of driving, it pains us to suggest the third-generation Toyota Prius to anyone. But the Prius lives in reality, not some twisty traffic-free fantasy. As of this writing, the national gas average is $3.20 a gallon according to AAA Insurance. Now the ol' Prius, with its EPA-estimated 48 mpg combined fuel economy, seems to be a pretty awesome suggestion. Easy to drive and quiet, the Prius also has more cargo space than every new Ford EcoSport, Chevrolet Trax, Toyota C-HR, and Jeep Renegade. The EPA says it can travel almost 580 miles between fill-ups. And with today's ridiculous fuel prices, refilling a Prius from empty would cost about $38.

Toyota Prius V (2012—2014)

If you're already a Prius fan, here's one that's 6.0 inches longer, with 70 percent more cargo space. The Prius V has the interior cargo space of a Honda CR-V or Ford Escape but in the shape of a wagon. There are four trim levels, aptly named Two, Three, Four, and Five. Top trim Prius V Five models come with heated seats and LED headlights, the latter giving it top marks in IIHS safety ratings. Although all Prius V models earned Good ratings in IIHS crash testing, every Prius V below the top trim came standard with halogen projector headlights that scored poorly during testing. Every Prius V uses a 134-hp four-cylinder hybrid engine with a CVT and front-wheel drive. It's also got the slowest acceleration on this list, with a time of 10.3 seconds to 60 mph during our testing.

Toyota Sienna (2011—2014)

It's unlikely any kid will beg for a minivan as their first car, especially if they've spent their entire elementary career being carted around in one. But if a third-generation Toyota Sienna is already in the family, it might be a good idea to keep it there. The Sienna was available in both eight- or seven-passenger versions and powered by either a 187-hp four-cylinder for base Siennas and LE trim models or a 266-hp V-6 engine available on any trim but standard for Sienna SE, XLE, and Limited models. At the time, the Sienna was the only minivan that offered all-wheel drive (only available on V-6 models), but that dropped EPA-estimated fuel economy to 16 mpg city and 22 mpg highway from the front-wheel-drive four-cylinder Sienna's 19 mpg in the city and 26 mpg highway. That said, it'd be a lot easier to move them to college in the bread van that is the Sienna than anything else on this list.

Toyota Venza (2009—2015)

Putting your teenager behind the wheel of a Toyota Venza grants a few promises. Even if your youngster launches from a stoplight, a full-throttle pin to 60 mph in 8.4 seconds (for all-wheel-drive V-6 models) will likely take long enough to be interrupted by another stoplight before 60 mph happens. With an EPA-estimated 24 mpg on the highway, it's probably not the thirstiest SUV in the parking lot at field-hockey practice. And you can get a full night of sleep, knowing the Venza was an IIHS Top Safety Pick from its debut and until it was discontinued in 2015. The new Venza is a fancier RAV4 Hybrid, and is still too new to fit under a $10,000 budget.

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Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/features/g33533698/safest-most-reliable-cars-and-suvs-for-teens-for-under-10000/

Be Smart, Check in Advance. CARFAX — Your Vehicle History.

CARFAX — Your Vehicle History Expert

Sometimes what you don't know can't hurt you, but that's not the case when buying a used car. As an independent vehicle history provider, at CARFAX we've made it our mission to tell you everything you need to know by uncovering as many events as possible from the previous life of a used car. Our primary goal is to help you get to know your next car from the inside out before deciding to make an investment that will be part of you and your family's everyday life. We believe your next car shouldn't be hiding anything from you.

CARFAX Vehicle History Reports contain over 28 billion historical records from 20 European countries, the US and Canada, which are updated daily with new information.

Even if you live in a country we don't collect vehicle data from, it's still always worth checking the Vehicle Identification Number without obligation. The used car import and export market is booming and many owners would be surprised to find out exactly what happened to their vehicle during its previous life abroad.

Privacy for Customers — Transparency over Vehicles

Let's be clear: Although we strive to find every detail of a vehicle's life so far, we are focused only on the vehicle's history, and do not collect any information on previous owners. The information we provide relates solely to the vehicle, its odometer reading, any accidents that have been covered up, where the vehicle comes from and much more — it never gets personal. We've uncovered irreparable damage several times in the past, but other times our vehicle history checks draw a blank — and sometimes that's actually a good thing.

Second Hand — Not Second Best

Did you know that considerably more used cars are sold than new cars? We think this second-hand system is nothing short of fantastic. However, it goes without saying that it gives rise to different methods and tactics: Some sellers will disguise a car that's been in an accident under a fresh coat of paint, tamper with the odometer or conceal theft. This is one of the less appealing aspects of buying second hand. Our goal is to establish trusting relationships between buyers and sellers, since this is the best way to help customers make the right decision. Your new car should be reliable and make you feel safe, as well as make you feel like you haven't paid too much.

But more than anything else, we don't want you or your family unknowingly sitting behind the wheel of a vehicle that isn't 100% safe. This is why we strive to take these vehicles off the road, which not only makes the used car market safer but our streets safer too.

CARFAX — 35+ Years of Experience in Vehicle Histories

CARFAX was founded in the US in 1984 and expanded into Europe in 2007. Around 100 team members spread across six European offices process vehicle information from 22 countries.

Fostering strategic partnerships with registration authorities, law enforcement agencies, government departments, insurance companies, inspection centers and numerous other leading companies around the world has enabled us to compile a unique international database for vehicle histories. We use this database to help make the used car market more transparent. We give everyone in the process of buying a used car access to what is currently the world's most comprehensive source for vehicle history reports, and is growing day by day.

We remain neutral and independent despite our partnerships — our sole purpose is help customers make an informed choice and ensure their safety and the safety of their family. This includes never collecting any personal details — we do not accept any PII from data sources amongst the information we provide about a vehicle. We ensure that data protection laws are observed at all times. Furthermore, we always collect our data in compliance with legal and regulatory frameworks — in all the countries in which we are active. We expressly distance ourselves from illegal activities such as data theft, scraping and hacking.

Sours: https://www.carfax.com/Used-Cars-Under-15000_f7
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Driven \u0026 Reviewed: Top Five Best All-New Cars of 2016

10 Top Picks of 2016: Best Cars of the Year

Car shoppers always seek the best car. How they define it may differ, and the buying decision certainly factors in price and pure emotional appeal.

For Consumer Reports, we define the "best" car as the one that excels in our extensive tests, as well as shines for reliability, safety, and owner satisfaction. Certainly, there are many good cars on the market today to choose from. But when a reader asks us to definitively name the best, the 10 Top Picks are our answers across popular categories. And we have the data to back it up.

Performance: To qualify, each model must rank at or near the top of its class in our road-test score.

Reliability: Models must have an average or better predicted reliability rating based on problems reported by subscribers for the 740,000 vehicles in our 2015 auto survey.

Owner satisfaction: We surveyed our subscribers about their happiness level regarding the 230,000 vehicles in their garages. Would they buy their car again?

Safety: Top Picks must perform effectively in crash or rollover tests conducted by the government and insurance industry (if tested).

See the vehicles that made our Top Picks list in 2021, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, and 2010.

Thinking about the first new car for yourself or someone in your family? This Honda may just be the perfect fit. It’s thrifty with fuel, returning a competitive 33 mpg overall, and yet its nimble handling never gives off a “compromise car” vibe. It has remarkable interior space for such a tiny footprint, with second-row seats that elegantly stow away or flip up to hold more cargo. A rear-view camera is standard. Road noise does boom in, and its rough ride can be tiring on long drives. Still, owner satisfaction is high, and its crash-test scores have improved over its predecessor. For just under $20,000, the Fit can be an easy-to-park runabout that keeps you smiling.

Read our complete Honda Fit road test.

Despite its compact size, the car’s ride and overall comfort will surprise you. It has expansive window glass, lots of interior space for a car of its size, intuitive controls, a suite of available safety technology, great crash-test results, and an available hatchback version to haul bulky cargo. If you live where there’s heavy snowfall, you’ll appreciate its superb all-wheel-drive traction. The Impreza is a smart, practical car.

Read our complete Subaru Impreza road test.

Sure, it might seem like vanilla, but vanilla happens to be the best-selling flavor of ice cream. The Camry’s no-fuss driving experience—great outward visibility, controls that fall easily to hand, a roomy interior—may not be the most thrilling in its class, but it’s far from plain. A quiet cabin, slick powertrains, a comfortable ride, and sound handling make it pleasant and capable. A Hybrid version delivers excellent fuel economy while remaining reasonably affordable. The solid Camry delivers year after year of outstanding reliability, which when combined with impressive crash-test results, make it a near-perfect sedan and one of our 10 Top Picks.

Read our complete Toyota Camry road test.

We hear all the time that Subaru is “the official car of New England.” But the Forester is good enough to be the small SUV of Everywhere. It’s roomy, rides comfortably, and handles unflappably. Its AWD system routed the Toyota RAV4 and Honda CR-V in our snow-driving evaluations. Fuel economy is among class leaders. It also has the best sight lines from the driver’s seat of any model on the market. Forward-collision warning and automatic braking aren’t standard, but they’re available across most of the lineup at affordable prices. Strong IIHS crash-test scores make it a safe cocoon.

Read our complete Subaru Forester road test.

Lexus created the luxury crossover segment almost 20 years ago, and its dominance hasn’t diminished since. Origami styling and its “Predator” grille show that the RX has shifted from being an understated part of the Little League parking lot to a more extroverted design player. But don’t let its new edginess confuse the picture. You’ll still find a quiet and comfortable cabin, effortless power delivery, a smooth ride, and a tastefully done interior fit and finish. The hybrid version gets an impressive 29 mpg overall. It’s not a taut, high-performance machine of the German school; it lacks that razor-crisp handling, steering feedback, and sharp brakes. But what the RX does focus on—coddling well-heeled customers with reliable calmness—it does well.

Read our complete Lexus RX road test.

Nobody packs more fun-per-dollar into a pint-sized package than Mazda. The MX-5 Miata combines lithe, precise handling with a crisp manual stick shift and a zoomy engine—that gets an enviable 34 mpg—to create the perfect car for the enthusiast driver and weekend racer. An easy-to-stow soft top is the clincher. It’s reliable, too. With its jumpy, firm suspension, loud cabin, and tight quarters for taller drivers, the Miata isn’t a commuter car. But given a sunny day and a winding road, none of that matters. We love this car, and that's why it's one of our 10 Top Picks.

Read our complete Mazda MX-5 Miata road test.

Long relegated to the inglorious life of airport rental fleets, the newest version of the Impala puts the competition in its rearview mirror. It proves an American automaker knows how to make an outstanding car for the masses. The Impala is dynamic and comfortable, combining a cushy ride with responsive handling, beating some elite luxury sedans at their own game. The controls are refreshingly intuitive, without resorting to overcomplicated interfaces. There’s enough cabin space to fit five with plenty of elbow and leg room. Trust us: It’s impressively good.

Read our complete Chevrolet Impala road test.

This is a great SUV hiding in plain sight. Most midsized crossovers often feel like uninspiring errand runners. But the Sorento offers class-above elegance at mainstream prices. It’s a shade smaller than its midsized competitors, but that allows the Sorento to be city-friendly while still offering the space and features of a larger vehicle. The smooth 290-hp V6 is responsive with competitive fuel economy, and the suspension absorbs the worst bumps and ruts with dignity while still giving you confidence in corners. The interior design is flat-out gorgeous. Well-above-average predicted reliability combines with good crash-test results. There’s a new king of the category.

Read our complete Kia Sorento road test.

Is aluminum body construction macho enough for a big truck? You bet. By eschewing traditional steel body panels, Ford created a pickup that weighs less, enabling it to be quick off the line and fuel-efficient. The 2.7-liter turbo V6 has more grunt than truck traditionalists may expect. And it gets 1 mpg better than a comparable Chevy, which adds up over the life of a truck. The cabin is extremely quiet and spacious, with large windows and relatively narrow windshield pillars to aid outward visibility. The intuitive Sync 3 infotainment system is a welcome update from the bogged-down MyFord Touch setup. Top-notch crash-test results and the best predicted reliability of any domestic truck make the F-150 a solid workhorse and one of 2016's 10 Top Picks.

Read our complete Ford F-150 road test.

Most people don’t dream of minivans, but the Sienna is super-reliable transport with all of the modern features an active, connected family would want. Its spacious and multifunctional interior, with available seating for eight, mates well with the Sienna’s magic carpet ride and energetic powertrain. Available all-wheel drive removes the excuse for buying a less practical SUV. Let the neighbors poke gentle fun at your capitulation to family realities. Soon enough, they’ll be begging to borrow your Sienna to make a Home Depot run.

Read our complete Toyota Sienna road test.


Consumer Reports

Since 1936, Consumer Reports has been testing products and working to create a fairer, safer, and healthier marketplace. Click  here to learn more about Consumer Reports' mission as a nonprofit organization. To help support our work, please consider making a  tax-deductible donation. You can also show support by liking us on  Facebook and following us on  Twitter.

Sours: https://www.consumerreports.org/cars/best-cars-top-picks-2016-a7024450542/

Cars 2016 nice

Be Smart, Check in Advance. CARFAX — Your Vehicle History.

CARFAX — Your Vehicle History Expert

Sometimes what you don't know can't hurt you, but that's not the case when buying a used car. As an independent vehicle history provider, at CARFAX we've made it our mission to tell you everything you need to know by uncovering as many events as possible from the previous life of a used car. Our primary goal is to help you get to know your next car from the inside out before deciding to make an investment that will be part of you and your family's everyday life. We believe your next car shouldn't be hiding anything from you.

CARFAX Vehicle History Reports contain over 28 billion historical records from 20 European countries, the US and Canada, which are updated daily with new information.

Even if you live in a country we don't collect vehicle data from, it's still always worth checking the Vehicle Identification Number without obligation. The used car import and export market is booming and many owners would be surprised to find out exactly what happened to their vehicle during its previous life abroad.

Privacy for Customers — Transparency over Vehicles

Let's be clear: Although we strive to find every detail of a vehicle's life so far, we are focused only on the vehicle's history, and do not collect any information on previous owners. The information we provide relates solely to the vehicle, its odometer reading, any accidents that have been covered up, where the vehicle comes from and much more — it never gets personal. We've uncovered irreparable damage several times in the past, but other times our vehicle history checks draw a blank — and sometimes that's actually a good thing.

Second Hand — Not Second Best

Did you know that considerably more used cars are sold than new cars? We think this second-hand system is nothing short of fantastic. However, it goes without saying that it gives rise to different methods and tactics: Some sellers will disguise a car that's been in an accident under a fresh coat of paint, tamper with the odometer or conceal theft. This is one of the less appealing aspects of buying second hand. Our goal is to establish trusting relationships between buyers and sellers, since this is the best way to help customers make the right decision. Your new car should be reliable and make you feel safe, as well as make you feel like you haven't paid too much.

But more than anything else, we don't want you or your family unknowingly sitting behind the wheel of a vehicle that isn't 100% safe. This is why we strive to take these vehicles off the road, which not only makes the used car market safer but our streets safer too.

CARFAX — 35+ Years of Experience in Vehicle Histories

CARFAX was founded in the US in 1984 and expanded into Europe in 2007. Around 100 team members spread across six European offices process vehicle information from 22 countries.

Fostering strategic partnerships with registration authorities, law enforcement agencies, government departments, insurance companies, inspection centers and numerous other leading companies around the world has enabled us to compile a unique international database for vehicle histories. We use this database to help make the used car market more transparent. We give everyone in the process of buying a used car access to what is currently the world's most comprehensive source for vehicle history reports, and is growing day by day.

We remain neutral and independent despite our partnerships — our sole purpose is help customers make an informed choice and ensure their safety and the safety of their family. This includes never collecting any personal details — we do not accept any PII from data sources amongst the information we provide about a vehicle. We ensure that data protection laws are observed at all times. Furthermore, we always collect our data in compliance with legal and regulatory frameworks — in all the countries in which we are active. We expressly distance ourselves from illegal activities such as data theft, scraping and hacking.

Sours: https://www.carfax.com/Used-Cars-Under-10000_f6
Driven \u0026 Reviewed: Top Five Best All-New Cars of 2016

Best Used Cars Under $15,000 For 2021

It’s possible to stroll down to a dealer today and drive home in a brand new base-model Chevrolet Spark for less than $15,000. It’s cheap and cheerful, and comes in cool colors like “Passion Fruit,” but it’s also a tiny machine with crank windows and no active safety features. But the same amount of cash can also buy you a vast array of used cars that are bigger, faster, flashier and come with more features. 

The effects of Covid-19 on the automotive supply chain have caused used car prices to increase over the last year, but buying a used car is easier and less risky than ever before. Thanks to improvements in quality and technology, the average age of cars on U.S. roads is now 12.1 years, according to data from IHS Markit. What’s more, $15,000 is a budget large enough to include some Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) vehicles, which carry extended manufacturer or dealer-backed warranties.

Glancing at $15,000 used car listings yields everything from tail-finned DeSotos to Porsche parts cars, but the majority of buyers are interested in squeezing the most value out of their dollar for a daily driver. Using a combination of owner feedback, reliability ratings, average transaction prices and expertise from the Forbes Wheels staff, we compiled a list of 20 of the best used vehicles $15,000 will buy.    

To meet our criteria, cars had to be newer than the 2008 model year and commonly available nationwide for under $15,000. We prioritized newness, reliability scores, low costs of ownership and the likelihood of being able to find a vehicle with a meaningful warranty. Against these priorities we factored in available safety and convenience features, style and performance. There is some overlap with our list of the Best Used Cars for $10,000; and vehicles on that list can often be found in better condition at this higher price point. We always recommend a mechanical inspection before purchase as even the most historically reliable cars suffer over time without proper maintenance.

1. 2014 to 2018 Mazda3

Why we picked it: Introduced in late 2013, the third-generation Mazda3 transformed what was already a good compact car into a truly great one and helped start Mazda’s upmarket journey. Pretty to look at inside and out, its slick style is matched with lots of tech. A modern infotainment screen sits atop the dash, and Touring and Grand Touring trims offer blind spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alerts. The third-gen 3 is powered by a pair of peppy four-cylinder engines, a 2.0-liter with 155 horsepower or a 2.5-liter unit with 184, with an available manual transmission. Like earlier 3s, it’s fun to drive and available as a sedan or a more practical hatchback, but it also layers on better reliability ratings than the previous designs.

Pros:

  • Sporty handling, involving performance
  • Practical available hatchback body
  • Modern design and features

Cons:

  • Fewer features on base models
  • Hard to find CPO examples at this price
  • Sedan lacks trunk space; not the biggest back seat

2. 2011-2015 Lexus CT 200h

Why we picked it: As a compact commuter car, it’s hard to top the CT 200h. A relative of the Toyota Prius, the CT inherits superior fuel economy (up to 42 mpg combined) but layers on the Lexus experience. It has a plush, quiet and comfortable interior with up to 34.8 cubic-feet of cargo space and many available tech features, including navigation and a dated but functional infotainment system. It also enjoys Lexus’ reputation for quality, with high marks for long-term durability and low costs of ownership. The only thing it lacks is real performance. The CT handles well, but despite racy styling and “F-Sport” body kits, it has just 134 horsepower on tap, and is more sedate to drive than it looks.

Pros:

  • Good looking and luxurious
  • Excellent fuel mileage, low costs of ownership
  • Reputation for quality

3. 2016-2018 Honda Civic

Why we picked it: A fun car to drive even in its base trim, the tenth-generation 2016 Civic was a proper return to form after Honda took criticism for the unengaging design of the previous Civic (2011-2015). Though 2018 and newer models, and Type R and Si models, cost more than $15,000 in good condition, the earlier Civic sedan and coupe from this generation all make great used car buys. Dependable, fun and roomy for a compact, some models can also be found with 7-inch infotainment screens and safety systems like adaptive cruise control, lane departure warnings and forward automatic emergency braking. Most affordable Civics are powered by a 158-horsepower 1.5-liter engine mated to a continuously variable automatic transmission.

Pros:

  • Dependable and safe
  • Fun to drive and fuel-efficient
  • Many available features

Cons:

  • Well-equipped and high-performance versions are pricey
  • Clunky infotainment system; no touchscreen on base
  • Over-aggressive lane keep assist

4. 2014 to 2017 Mazda6

Why we picked it: The current generation of the Mazda6 launched in 2014 and was refreshed in 2018. All-new models are still on in its current form and it continues to be one of the best midsize sedans on the market. The 6 prioritizes curb appeal and driving dynamics but is as practical as a Camry. These earlier years don’t have some of the later models’ features, but they’re just as stylish and fun to drive. Power comes from the same 2.5-liter, 184 horsepower engine used in the Mazda3. Like that car, Touring and Grand Touring models came with blind spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alerts from the start, and all models got them by the end of 2017. 2014 and 2015 models have an older infotainment screen, and 2016 and 2017’s newer unit can be clunky, but the 6’s cabin and controls are user friendly. Reliability scores lag the Camry and Accord, but the 6 is still a quality choice.

Pros:

  • Stylish, fun and family-friendly
  • Many modern features, design still on sale in 2021
  • Comfy, premium-feeling cabin

Cons:

  • Not as powerful as V6 rivals
  • Firmer ride than most family sedans
  • Not the biggest back seat or trunk

5. 2012 to 2017 Toyota Prius

Why we picked it: The Prius dominates the Lyft lane at the airport because it blends roomy practicality with almost unbeatable low costs of operation. Solid durability and all-star fuel economy are baked into the package even if driving fun is not. Many have been pushed into gig driving service, but these years cover examples of both the third (2010-2015) and fourth (2016 to present) generation models. Plenty of clean models can be found priced at or under $15,000. With these newer cars, there’s no need to worry about replacing the battery pack, which is still under warranty and long-lived anyway. The downside of the Prius is that it’s built to be a workhorse, with a basic interior and a dull driving experience.

Pros:

  • Cheap to buy and own
  • Lots of room for people and gear
  • Very reliable

Cons:

  • People will think you’re their Uber
  • Boring to drive
  • Few amenities, lots of road noise

6. 2014 to 2017 Chevrolet Impala

Why we picked it: The final (so far) iteration of Chevrolet’s famous full-sizer, this generation of Impala only went out of production in 2020. It was redesigned in 2014 and was better looking and dynamically superior to the previous-generation Impala. It also repeatedly drew accolades from typically harsh critics like Consumer Reports. The sleek styling is matched with a contemporary and roomy cabin as well as a relatively modern infotainment system. Its large body incorporates an 18.8 cubic-foot trunk. Power comes from a pair of four-cylinder engines, a 182-horsepower 2.4-liter unit with hybrid assist (2014 only) or a 196-horsepower 2.5 liter, with a 305-horsepower 3.6-liter V6 optional, all driving the front wheels. The Impala’s reliability ratings lag the Toyota Avalon’s, but it’s also a more affordable car with more space and power.

Pros:

  • Roomy interior and trunk
  • Powerful engines
  • Comfortable and quiet, with a smooth ride

Cons:

  • Poor four-cylinder fuel economy
  • No active safety features
  • Limited rear visibility

7. 2012 to 2017 Toyota Camry

Why we picked it: The seventh-generation Camry, introduced in 2012, offered a design overhaul and overall improvements, including more interior room and superior fuel economy got better in almost all models. It also earned slightly higher marks for reliability than the sixth-generation version, though both are very high quality cars. Though the infotainment system is dated, the Camry’s cabin is practical as ever, and some models options including navigation, blind spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alerts. There are four-cylinder, V6 and Hybrid models returning up to 28, 25 and 40 mpg, respectively. The driving experience is bland, but for transportation the Camry is hard to beat.

Pros:

  • Famously reliable
  • Popular and easy to find in different trims
  • User friendly and easy to live with

Cons:

  • Not exciting
  • Early models and lower trims may lack features
  • Base engine, hybrid not very powerful

8. 2016 to 2019 Scion iA/Toyota Yaris iA/Yaris

Why we picked it: Very cheap subcompact cars don’t have to be unpleasant, and the iA is proof. It’s fun to drive, capable of delivering up to 35 mpg combined, fairly well equipped and earns good safety scores. The iA was introduced as a Scion in 2016, became the Yaris iA in 2017 and then finally just “Yaris” in 2019. It’s actually built by Mazda and is sold overseas as the Mazda2 (an earlier version made our best used cars for $5,000 list). The iA/Yaris is powered by a 106-horsepower 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine and comes in automatic or manual-transmission form. A 7-inch infotainment screen and low-speed automatic emergency braking come standard. Nearly-new examples, including CPO cars, can be found for $15,000.

Pros:

  • Good looking inside and out
  • Fun and reliable
  • Likely to come with a good warranty

Cons:

  • Small inside, particularly in back
  • Hatchback model only added in 2019, hard to find
  • Lacks active safety features beyond automatic emergency braking

9. 2013 to 2015 Lexus ES

Why we picked it: All generations of the ES rate very highly as used vehicles, with excellent reliability records and a slate of JD Power awards. The ES, Lexus’ upmarket sister to the Toyota Camry, is now in its sixth generation. Its current-form debut in 2013 mirrored some of the changes to the Camry, including larger and more bolder styling, with themes that continue on today’s Lexuses. In these years the ES came as the V6 ES 350, with plenty of oomph, or the frugal four-cylinder ES 300h Hybrid, which was slower but could return up to 40 mpg combined. As on the Camry, blind spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alerts were available, but some cars also have lane departure warnings or adaptive cruise control. As with earlier ES models, the driving experience is quiet and refined but not very exciting.

Pros:

  • Comfy, luxurious and stylish
  • V6 or Hybrid power
  • Lots of technology and features

Cons:

  • Sedate driving experience
  • Well-equipped cars hard to find for $15,000
  • Hybrid underpowered

10. 2010 to 2015 Chevrolet Camaro

Why we picked it: After an eight year absence, Chevrolet’s famous pony car returned in 2010 with an all-new design that directly referenced the original 1967 to 1969 Camaro. Unlike Camaros of old, the reborn design put as much of an emphasis on handling finesse as it did raw power, resulting in a car that was as fun to drive on twisty roads as drag strips, and still is. At $15,000, most used examples will be V6 models, but that’s no bad thing. Unlike the underpowered V6 Camaros of the 1980s and 1990s, the new twin-cam 3.6-liter version made 304 horsepower to start and later 323, mated to a six-speed manual or automatic transmission. The stylish Camaro is lots of fun and boasts a good reliability record too, but its interior is a well of cheap gray plastics.

Pros:

  • Stylish and fun
  • Available convertible
  • Even the V6 model is quick

Cons:

  • Dark, plasticky interior
  • V8 models very hard to find at this price
  • Potentially abused

11. 2015 to 2018 Volkswagen Golf

Why we picked it: The seventh-generation Golf, like its predecessors, is a no-nonsense practical compact hatchback served with a healthy helping of driving fun. Production of this generation of Golf only just ended and you can still buy new examples, but these earlier years featured more variety, as the Golf was offered as a three- and five-door hatchback as well as a four-door station wagon, and as the fully-electric e-Golf. Our 2021 review can shed some light on what the Golf is like to drive and live with, and most versions came with a 1.8-liter, 170-horsepower four-cylinder engine. The e-Golf is just as practical, offered only as a five-door hatch, and offers both good reliability and performance, but has a range of just 83 miles. A variety of active safety features were optional, though they may raise the price on used units.

Pros:

  • Practical and comfortable
  • Fuel-efficient
  • Fun to drive

Cons:

  • e-Golf range limited
  • Well-equipped examples may be expensive
  • Basic interior

12. 2015 to 2018 Kia Soul

Why we picked it: The more refined and better-equipped second generation of Kia’s upright, funky not-quite-a-crossover Soul arrived in 2014. Affordable and practical, this Soul is a small machine, just 163 inches long, but packs in SUV room: even tall folks can sit comfortably in back and there are 24.2 cubic-feet of cargo space behind the rear seats, 61.3 with them folded. Base models feel basic and make due with a 130-horsepower 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine, underpowered for the car. Fancier versions get better infotainment systems, cool wheels and a 164-horsepower 2.0-liter unit. It’s not exciting to drive but it’s amazingly practical. We’ve left off model year 2014 as its reliability ratings are lower than later years. Kia also offered an EV Soul in these years, which is a practical choice and often better equipped than the gas-powered Soul, though range is limited to 93 miles.

Pros:

  • Cool and practical
  • Lots of room
  • Available EV and many nice optional features

Cons:

  • No active safety features
  • Underpowered, underequipped base model
  • So-so fuel economy

13. 2014 to 2018 Toyota Corolla

Why we picked it: After many years of minimal change, Toyota completely redesigned the compact Corolla for 2014 into a striking new design that preserved all of the model’s traditional virtues. Far more modern inside and out, this Corolla featured a modern infotainment system with a 6.1-inch screen, optional at first but later standard, and from 2017 a suite of advanced driver-assist gear. A long options list means equipment varies by model, but all Corollas are high-quality machines. Power derives from a pair of 1.8-liter four-cylinder engines at 132 or 140 horsepower, with either a manual, conventional automatic or continuously variable transmission, though the regular automatic was dropped in 2017. The Corolla is an ace commuter, but not fast or much fun to drive, and owners report that it’s noisy at speed.

Pros:

  • Practical and reliable
  • Lots of nice available features
  • Excellent marks for safety

Cons:

  • Underpowered and noisy on the highway
  • Boring to drive
  • Base models lack equipment

14. 2012 to 2017 Hyundai Azera

Why we picked it: Hyundai’s answer to the Toyota Avalon and Chevrolet Impala, the Azera is a big and roomy V6-powered sedan that was Hyundai’s fanciest mainstream model in the mid-2010s. Though it falls short of the reliability of the Avalon or the size and speed of the Impala, the Azera gets high marks for reliability and owner satisfaction. Earlier Azeras were both dull to drive and look at, but the second-generation model is much more visually appealing. This generation also came with a standard 7-inch touchscreen with navigation (later enlarged to 8 inches with more functions) and from 2015 standard blind spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alerts, with more safety features optional. 

Pros:

  • Lots of room
  • Many desirable features 
  • Quiet and comfortable

Cons:

  • Indifferent handling
  • Newer and better-equipped models push price cap
  • Slow, despite V6 power

15. 2013 to 2017 Honda Accord

Why we picked it: When the midsize Accord sedan and coupe were redesigned for 2013 into their ninth generation, they brought back some of the sportiness of earlier Accords while adding lots of new technology. From the start these Accords came standard with an 8-inch infotainment screen and had optional safety features that included forward automatic emergency braking, blind spot monitoring and, on the highest-spec models, adaptive cruise control. In 2016, the Accord got standard Apple CarPlay. The sporty handling makes for an engaging drive, backed by a 184 or 189-horsepower 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine or a 278-horsepower 3.5-liter V6, the former also coming with a manual transmission option. A rare plug-in hybrid was offered for 2014 and 2015, but isn’t easy to find.

Pros:

  • Engaging driving experience
  • Packed with tech features
  • Coupe and manual transmission options

Cons:

  • Forgettable styling
  • Reliability ratings lag Camry
  • Top trims and best options may cost more than $15,000

16. 2010 to 2014 Ford Mustang

Why we picked it:Ford gave the circa-2005 Mustang design a major refresh in 2010, with updated interior and exterior styling, and then added a powerful new V6 engine in 2011. While $15,000 will probably not be enough to swing a clean, low-mileage 4.6 or 5.4-liter V8 Mustang from these years, the 2011-and-newer 3.7-liter V6 offers 305 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque, numbers far in excess of the 1990s 5.0 Mustang. The Mustang’s interior is nicer than the Camaro’s and it has a little more cargo room, though both cars are plasticky and have tiny back seats and poor rear visibility. Fun to drive and practical, the Mustang is an excellent entry-level enthusiast car that can double as a commuter and has a solid reliability record.

Pros:

  • Fun to drive and be seen in
  • Powerful V6 engine, capable handling
  • Nicely designed interior, convertible option

Cons:

  • 2010 model V6 rougher and less powerful than later V6
  • Clea V8 models hard to find at this price
  • Base models lack equipment

17. 2013 to 2018 Volkswagen Passat

Why we picked it: Branching off from the global design, this generation of the Passat was designed specifically for North American buyers, who favor lots of interior room and a smooth ride. Though it’s been updated a couple of times, this Passat is still on sale in 2021. The Passat’s cabin is accordingly comfortable and premium-looking, and over time it gained modern infotainment and driver-assist gear, including adaptive cruise control, blind spot monitoring, and rear cross-traffic alerts (from 2016). Most Passats are powered by the 170-horsepower 1.8-liter four shared with the Golf or a 280-horsepower 3.6-liter V6, though some pre-2015 models used a 2.0-liter diesel four that was part of Dieselgate. Ownership costs are a little higher than on the Camry or Accord, but Passat owners give it high marks for value.

Pros:

  • Comfortable and roomy
  • Potent optional V6
  • Optional driver-assist gear

Cons:

  • Base engine underpowered
  • Soft ride comes at the expense of handling and steering feel
  • Older models lack features

18. 2013 to 2016 Subaru Outback

Why we picked it: The Outdoorsy Outback has been providing owners with all-wheel drive fun since 1996, and offers genuine go-anywhere capability and SUV-like room for people and cargo. These years cover the tail end of the fourth-generation and early fifth-generation Outbacks, which have higher reliability ratings than some older models. Both get top marks for safety and are broadly similar in look and feel, but 2015 and newer models have more active-safety features that are part of the then-optional Subaru EyeSight safety suite. These newer models also have nicer infotainment controls and more connected features. Six-cylinder models are out of this price range and even later four-cylinder models can be pricey. The base 2.5-liter, 175-horsepower four-cylinder engine feels a little underpowered in the Outback, but it’ll go lots of places other cars can’t.

Pros:

  • Off-road capability and standard all-wheel drive
  • SUV-like passenger and cargo space
  • Top marks for safety

Cons:

  • Higher than average maintenance costs
  • So-so fuel economy
  • Underpowered base engine

19. 2013 to 2016 Acura ILX

Why we picked it: Based on the Honda Civic as the original Acura Integra was, the Acura ILX returned the luxury brand to the compact car space. This design is still on sale in 2021, though it’s been facelifted a couple of times since it debuted. The ILX originally came with three four-cylinder engine choices, a 2.0-liter with 150 horsepower, a 2.4 liter with 201 horsepower, and a 1.5-liter hybrid model with 111 horsepower and a hybrid assist, but in 2016 all but the 2.4 liter were dropped. The ILX is fun, reliable and pretty to look at, with a modern interior not so different from 2021’s Acuras, but rear seat and trunk space are tight and it doesn’t feel luxurious. Apart from 2016, when optional extras like adaptive cruise control were added, these years also lack active-safety features.

Pros:

  • Fun to drive
  • Reliable and safe
  • Many available tech features

Cons:

  • Non-2.4-liter engines underpowered
  • Small back seat
  • Pre-2016 models lack active safety features

20. 2013 to 2015 Lincoln MKZ

Why we picked it: Lincoln’s fancied up version of the midsize Ford Fusion, the MKZ enjoys higher reliability ratings than than it’s humbler sister while also offering lots of style and many additional features. From the beginning this second-generation MKZ was offered with optional features like adaptive cruise control and lane keeping assist as well as luxury items like panoramic sunroofs and heated rear seats. A very stylish machine, its pretty and minimalist interior also houses a modern infotainment system, though its clunky by today’s standards. There are two 2.0-liter four-cylinder powertrains, a 240-horsepower turbo or a 188-system-horsepower hybrid offering up to 38 mpg combined. The MKZ isn’t very engaging to drive and the sloping roof constrains rear head room, but offers a real luxury experience at a bargain price.

Pros:

  • Sleek and stylish
  • Luxury interior and features
  • Big and comfy front seating area

Cons:

  • Cabin materials not as fancy as they look
  • Limousine-like handling
  • Dated, clunky infotainment

Methodology

To determine our list of the best vehicles under $15,000, we cross-referenced a broad range of reliability and quality scores, evaluations by vehicle testers, thousands of long-term reports and reviews from owners and factored in our own long-term experiences with these vehicles as new and used cars. In addition to these criteria, the vehicle had to have average transaction prices under or near $15,000, be manufactured after 2008, and be easy for shoppers to find irrespective of their region or city.

Many of the models fetured in our list of the best $10,000 used cars are available in even better condition for $15,000, and the Honda Fit, Toyota Avalon, and 2010 to 2014 Honda Insight nearly reappeared on this list. We recommend looking at those entries for shoppers on a budget. Some models with insufficient data, such as the 2008-2013 BMW Z4, which had very high reliability and quality scores, were left off the list due a lack of information or widespread availability.

We focused specifically on providing maximum value and reliability for the price, prioritizing models which are known for durability and low cost of operation, but also tried hard to provide a variety of models to suit different tastes. We also left off some models due to higher-than-average rmaintenance costs, such as the 2008-2014 Mercedes-Benz C-class.Although we can generally provide guidance on which models may be the best value or the most reliable, we cannot make any guarantees about how individual cars will perform. We did the research, but we still recommend you investigate your choices further before purchase and we advise pre-purchase inspections whenever possible. Theoretically, that’s easier than ever as there are now many mobile mechanic services that can come to the vehicle directly.

FAQ

What’s the best place to buy a used car under $15,000?

The most cost-effective route to buying a used car is usually buying from a private seller, as they don’t have the overhead costs of car dealerships and they tend to have service records that can provide valuable insight into your purchase. However, for $15,000 most cars under eight years old will come with some form of meaningful warranty, and some may qualify for extended warranties or CPO (certified pre-owned) programs, and here buyers are better served visiting a franchise dealer, including new-vehicle stores, which often stock a variety of late-model used cars. Dealers are in a better position to provide assistance with extended warranties and financing, though consumers still have the option to line up these parts of the transaction on their own.

What’s the best used car for $15,000? Are there ones that are more reliable than others?

That depends on your needs. We’ve tried to provide a wide array of choices to suit enthusiasts, commuters, families and shoppers who’d rather have a newer vehicle with a warranty and are okay skimping a little on size or features. We’ve ranked our choices by multiple factors, with an emphasis on reliability ratings and owner’s perceptions of the value they got out of their purchases. Each of these vehicles is a good choice, though we did find that the most reliable cars on the list were the Mazda3, Lexus ES, Toyota Corolla, Toyota Prius, and Acura ILX.

Is it better to buy a new car or a used car? Can I buy a new car for $15,000?

You can buy a new car for $15,000, but at this price point, a used car is a better bet for long-term satisfaction and for getting the features you want. Only one or two of the most basic vehicles of 2021 fall into that price range, and they often peak past it with destination fees. Opting for a used car instead opens up much more purchasing power and is in some respects a more sound investment. 

Sours: https://www.forbes.com/wheels/features/best-used-cars-under-15000/

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The best-looking cars of 2016 (that weren't sports cars)

We're not difficult creatures to understand, really.

We all have a Jungian connection to objects that we can identify as "beautiful" before our next breath. Examples? Sure. The Sistine Chapel, orchids, anything written by Vaughan Williams, the KFC Double Down sandwich, and sports cars.

All of those share something in common: the Golden Ratio, which is the division of an object so the larger part is to the whole is the same ratio of the smaller part to the larger. (We probably got that right. Maybe.)

Sports cars, what with their long hoods, muscular shoulders, wide hips, natural exhausts...wait, what? What we're saying is, sports cars have a built-in advantage.

There are beautiful cars beyond sports cars, and 2016 gave us some of the best. While most of our perfect scores on our new, rigorous rating system went to sports cars—one didn't. The Audi A7 was a perfect 10, and a heated internal debate landed the Range Rover at a near-perfect 9. 

Here were our non-sports car winners, in no particular order whatsoever.

2016 Audi A7

2016 Audi A7

2017 Audi A7

This one nearly cheats because of its dramatically sloping roofline, but we know a sedan when we see one—and we can't stop staring at the Audi A7. Audi's fastback is so good looking that they're bringing another to the U.S. this year: an A5 Sportback, which should appear on this list one year from today. Audi didn't invent the fastback sedan, but it has done a very good job with it so far.

2017 Cadillac CT6 Plug-In Hybrid

2017 Cadillac CT6 Plug-In Hybrid

2017 Cadillac CT6

Cadillac's newest sedan takes all of the good parts of the Art & Science look that we liked (CTS), and none of the elements we didn't like (ATS). The result is a good-looking sedan that can be a flagship for the luxury brand until something like the Escala shows up. The high window line helps, but the long hood and rear-wheel drive proportions help more.

2017 Mazda MAZDA6

2017 Mazda MAZDA6

2017 Mazda6

Depending on what day you catch us, we might argue that Mazda's lineup is the best looking in the biz—and they only have one sports car on the lot. The Mazda 6 is a very good expression of a front-drive sedan with rear-drive proportions.

2017 Volvo S90 R-Design

2017 Volvo S90 R-Design

2017 Volvo S90

Volvo's newest sedan set the table for two coming wagons that we like very much. Up front, the signature headlights and softly sculpted power dome in the hood, reach back into a better cabin with a higher-than-expected window line from Volvo. The sides are far from slab-sided; it's Scandinavian sensible without being boring. We're split on the back—half of us say it's lazy, the other half says its simple—but we all agree that it looks better in person.

2017 Buick Regal

2017 Buick Regal

2017 Buick Regal

Oh yeah, we can hear you rolling your eyes from here. The Buick Regal is one of GM's best looks in a decade—quote us. It's one of the older models in Buick's lineup, and the Avista concept clearly shows the direction Buick will be headed for the next decade. But for us, the Regal will be a tasty pick up in the next few years because we don't see those lines getting old anytime soon.

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Jeep's longtime SUV can stand up to vehicles twice its price thanks to a sturdy shape that not only looks authentic to the brand, but also pushes it forward into a new era. The 2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee is still one of our favorites because of its wide range—less-expensive models still look nice; top trims are true luxury SUVs—and because it's incredibly functional. Off road is still well within the Grand Cherokee's wheelhouse, same goes for a valet lot.

2017 Land Rover Range Rover

2017 Land Rover Range Rover

2017 Land Rover Range Rover

It's the shape that never gets old. Although the 2017 Land Rover Range Rover shares more lines in common with a brick than it does with anything born out of a wind tunnel, the Range Rover is one of our favorite looks because it's a direct line back to where it all began. This generation may be the furthest removed from the old Range Rovers we love to see (but perhaps we don't love to own them) but it's still instantly recognizable. That's a classic.

2017 Honda Civic

2017 Honda Civic

2017 Honda Civic

Honda's compact sedan made a big impression on us, ditto for the coupe and hatchback. It's latest generation righted the wrongs we found in older models—especially in perceived quality—but it also borrowed heavily from luxury automaker's playbooks for a simply drawn shape that's more appealing. In the broad, horizontal elements, we see a little BMW. In the shape and curves, we see a little Acura. That's great if you're buying a Honda Civic at half the price; maybe not if you've just purchased one of the others.

2018 Mercedes-Benz S-Class Coupe Night Edition

2018 Mercedes-Benz S-Class Coupe Night Edition

2017 Mercedes-Benz S-Class

The Mercedes-Benz flagship has a high bar to clear for its exclusive clientele—and it delivers. As impressive as the full-sizer's athletic shapes and muscular lines are on the outside, its doubly impressive inside. Of course, get to butch and you end up with a Hummer, but the S-Class strays far from too macho with an elegance and organic approach befitting its sky-high price tag.

2017 Bentley Bentayga Diesel

2017 Bentley Bentayga Diesel

2017 Bentley Bentayga

We said they didn't have to be sports cars, we didn't say anything about good looking cars being cheap. In the case of the Bentayga, it takes a somewhat-corporate diktat and manages to bring forward a Bentley, and an SUV at that. Its beauty is more subtle than the others; by looking at the front, you see that it's a single-piece fascia uncluttered with lines. Looking at the side reveals that it's one of the largest single pieces of stamped aluminum in the car world. In short, the Bentley looks expensive, which was probably the idea.

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Sours: https://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1108177_the-best-looking-cars-of-2016-that-werent-sports-cars


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