Uss boxer history

Uss boxer history DEFAULT

The Boxer (LHD 4) is the sixth Wasp-class amphibious assault ship of the United States Navy. She is the sixth U.S. Navy ship to bear the name for a British ship captured by the Americans during the War of 1812. The ship's keel was authenticated on April 8, 1991.

August 28, 1993 The Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Boxer was christened during a ceremony at Ingalls Shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi. Mrs. Becky Miller served as sponsor of the ship. Capt. Robert E. Annis is the prospective commanding officer.

November 21, 1994 After post-launch outfitting and testing, Ingalls delivered the PCU Boxer to the U.S. Navy.

USS Boxer was commissioned on February 11, 1995, and departed on Feb. 20 for sea trials and a voyage to its homeport in San Diego, Calif.

February 26, The Boxer anchored in Cristobal Harbor, Panama, before commencing Panama Canal transit. Port visit to Mazatlan, Mexico, from March 8-11.

March 15, USS Boxer arrived in its homeport of Naval Station San Diego after a four-week transit from Pascagoula, Mississippi; Commenced a two-month shipyard availability on March 26.

June 19, LHD 4 departed San Diego for a 25-day underway to conduct Combat Systems Ship qualification Testing (CSSQT); Conducted Command Assessment of Readiness and Training (CART) I from July 31- Aug. 4; Underway for CART II from Aug. 7-11; Underway for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) I on Sept. 1.

September 19, USS Boxer conducted its first AV-8B flight operations off the coast of southern California; Returned home on Sept. 2?.

January 24, 1996 USS Boxer departed homeport for sea trials after a three-week restricted availability.

March 12, The Boxer entered the Long Beach Naval Shipyard for a two-month Post Shakedown Availability (PSA); Underway for a Dependent's Day Cruise, en route to Naval Station San Diego, on May 10; Underway for TSTA II from May 13- June 7; Underway for TSTA III/FEP from July 8-19; Anchored off Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, from July 26-2?.

August 23, The amphibious assault ship departed San Diego en route to Pearl Harbor for magneting deperming; Underway for Comprehensive Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) 96-24M, in the Hawaiian Op. Area, on Sept. 3.

October 2, Capt. James K. Moran relieved Capt. Robert E. Annis as CO of the Boxer.

October 10, USS Boxer departed homeport for the second phase of COMPTUEX; Inport San Francisco, Calif., for Fleet Week from Oct. 12-1?; Underway for COMPTUEX 96-18M from Nov. 6-15.

March 24, 1997 USS Boxer departed Naval Station San Diego for its maiden deployment.

September 24, The Boxer Amphibious Ready Group and the 15th MEU returned home after a six-month deployment to the western Pacific, Red Sea, Arabian Gulf and Indian Ocean. The ship traveled more than 30,000 miles and visited 11 ports in nine countries.

December 5, 1998 USS Boxer ARG, along with the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), departed San Diego for its second deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR.

December 30, LHD 4 anchored in Victoria Harbour for a three-day liberty port visit to Hong Kong; Inport Singapore from January 6-11.

January 13, 1999 The Boxer anchored off the coast of Phuket for a five-day liberty port visit; Departed Thailand earlier than scheduled, in support of Non-Combatant Evacuation (NEO) contingency operations during the Ethiopia/Eritrea conflict.

March 1, The amphibious assault ship anchored off the coast of Manama, Bahrain, for a one-day port call; Anchored off Bahrain again from March 4-7; Inport Abu Dhabi, U.A.E., from March 12-16; Anchored off Kuwait City, Kuwait, for standdown from March 27- April 3.

April 9, USS Boxer pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a week-long liberty visit to Dubai; Anchored off Bali, Indonesia, from April 29- May 4; Inport Townsville, Australia, from May 11-16.

June 5, USS Boxer returned to San Diego after a week-long Tiger Cruise from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, completing the six-month deployment.

August 19, The Boxer commenced a nine-week Preventive Maintenance Availability (PMA) while moored at Naval Station San Diego.

September 24, Capt. Stephen D. Doyle relieved Capt. Robert C. Massey as commanding officer of the Boxer.

October 18, The Boxer departed homeport for a four-day underway to conduct All Comers At Sea Training (ACAT); Underway for CART II from Nov. 16-19.

January 11, 2000 USS Boxer depated homeport for a 10-day Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) A; Underway for TSTA B from Jan. 19-28 and Feb. 14-18; Underway for TSTA II from March ?-10.

From April 3-14, the Boxer was underway for Amphibious Specialty Training (AST); Underway for Amphibious Orientation Training (AOT) from May 22-25.

May 30, USS Boxer departed Naval Station San Diego to participate in a biennial multi-national exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2000, in the Hawaiian Op. Area; Returned home on July 13.

October 5, USS Boxer pulled into San Francisco, Calif., for a six-day port visit to participate in annual Fleet Week celebration; Returned home on Oct. 1?; Underway for INSURV inspection on Oct. 17; Underway for COMPTUEX from Oct. 30- Nov. 9; Underway for ammo onload from Nov. 13-17.

December 2, The Boxer anchored off the coast of Mazatlan, Mexico, for a four-day port visit.

March 13, 2001 USS Boxer departed San Diego for a scheduled six-month deployment with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU).

November 25, The Boxer entered the National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO) shipyard in San Diego for a four-month Drydocking Phased Maintenance Availability (DPMA).

May 11, 2002 USS Boxer returned to homeport after a five-day underway of Command Assessment of Readiness and Training (CART) II; Underway again for AAV Ops. from May 15-17.

June 10, The amphibious assault ship departed San Diego for TSTA A; Port visit to Mazatlan, Mexico, from June 15-18; Conducted TSTA B from June 18- July 4; Underway for TSTA II from July 8-13.

From July 24- August 3, the Boxer participated in a Joint Forces Command Exercise Millennium Challenge, off the coast of southern California; Underway for Amphibious Orientation Training (AOT) from Aug. 19-24; Underway for TSTA II from Aug. 27- Sept. 7; Underway for TSTA III from Sept. 18-27.

September 25, Capt. Thomas D. Crowley relieved Capt. Stephen D. Doyle as CO of the Boxer during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship, while underway in the SOCAL Op. Area.

October 12, USS Boxer arrived in San Francisco for a three-day port visit to participate in annual Fleet Week celebration.

In October, after a highy successful POTUS security operations, the Boxer conducted Underway Demonstration followed by the Final Evaluation Problem (FEP).

From Oct. 24-29, the amphibious assault ship participated in Medical Contingency Operation off the coast of Cabo San Lucas, Baja California, Mexico.

January 17, 2003 USS Boxer departed Naval Station San Diego, as part of the seven ships Amphibious Task Force (ATF) West, for a surge Middle East deployment.

From Feb. 24 through March 1, the Boxer offloaded Marines and equipment while anchored off Kuwait Naval Base.

April 1, U.S. Army Pfc. Jessica D. Lynch, captured by the Iraqis when her convoy was ambushed on March 23, was rescued from Saddam Hospital, An Nasiriyah. The daring operation by Task Force 20, including CH-46E Sea Knights from Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron (HMM) 165, CH-53E Super Stallions and Navy SEALs, began at midnight, supported by Marines from Task Force Charlie, who staged a diversionary attack to draw away Iraqi irregulars.

On April 20, USS Boxer, along with USS Tarawa (LHA 1), USS Saipan (LHA 2), USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), USS Bataan (LHD 5) and USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), operated with 26 other ships of Task Force 51 in the northern Arabian Gulf, comprising the largest concentration of amphibious power since the Korean War.

April 27, LHD 4 pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a week-long liberty port visit to Dubai.

USS Boxer operated in the Arabian Gulf for the duration of Operation Iraqi Freedom conducting coalition air control and identification, and providing sea-based support to Marine aviation units and U.S. and coalition ships in the region. Crew members also participated in mine countermeasure and small boat operations.

June 20, The Boxer arrived in Sydney, Australia, for a four-day port call; Inport Townsville from June 28- July 1.

July 14, The amphibious assault ship pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a three-day port call to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise.

July 26, USS Boxer returned to San Diego after more than a six-month combat deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Global War on Terrorism.

October 2, The Boxer departed homeport for a Friends and Family Day Cruise; Underway for ammo offload from Nov. 2-7; Inport San Francisco, Calif., from Nov. 13-16.

January 14, 2004 USS Boxer departed Naval Base San Diego in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom 2 force rotation. As part of the OIF 2 FR, the "Golden Gator" is providing amphibious lift for a portion of the equipment and personnel from the I Marine Expeditionary Force stationed at Camp Pendleton, Calif., and 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing stationed at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif.

February 6, The amphibious assault ship moored at Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a brief port call.

From February 19-28, the Boxer offloaded more than 200 U.S. Marine personnel and their equipment onto Kuwait Naval Base, along with the 16 CH-53 Sea Stallion helicopters from Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron (HMH) 466, 150 trucks with trailers, several aircraft towing vehicles and multiple large containers of ammunition.

March 1, USS Boxer moored at Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a three-day liberty visit to Dubai; Inport Goa, India, from March 9-12; Moored at Changi Naval Base in Singapore from March 20-23.

March 30, The Boxer arrived in Naval Base Sasebo, Japan, for a five-day port call and to exchange two landing craft air cushion (LCAC) vehicles that had been brought from San Diego. Assault Craft Unit 5 took charge of the two Sasebo LCACs, for a transport back to Camp Pendleton, Calif., for a routine overhaul.

April 16, LHD 4 pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a four-day port visit and to embark several members of the Afloat Training Group, Pacific, to conduct the Command Assessment of Readiness and Training (CART).

April 29, USS Boxer returned to San Diego after completing three-and-a-half month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

From June 7-11, the amphibious assault ship conducted deck landing qualifications and Type Training off the coast of southern California.

June 21, Capt. Thomas J. Culora relieved Capt. Thomas D. Crowley as CO of the "Golden Gator."

July 12, The Boxer departed homeport for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA); Commenced a Planned Maintenance Availability (PMA), while moored pierside at Naval Base San Diego, on Sept. 15; Underway for a Shakedown Cruise from Dec. 6-7; Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Dec. 8; Underway for Type Training from Jan. 18-21; Underway for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment on March 9.

April 29, 2005 USS Boxer departed San Diego for a scheduled western Pacific deployment.

May 17, LHD 4 arrived at Naval Station Sasebo, Japan, for a two-day port visit; Moored at Navy Pier in White Beach Naval Facility, Okinawa, from May 21-2?.

May 30, USS Boxer, along with the USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53), arrived in Darwin, Australia, for a scheduled port visit.

June 8, The Boxer arrived in Townsville, Australia, for a scheduled port visit before participating in a biannual joint exercise Talisman Saber 2005; Inport Townsville again from 26-2?.

July 5, USS Boxer moored at Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a two-day port call.

July 8, The amphibious assault ship moored in Port of Kuantan, Malaysia, for a four-day port visit before participating in a Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) exercise; Inport Kuantan again from July 15-19.

July 30, LHD 4 arrived in White Beach Naval Facility, Okinawa, to prepare for the third annual Joint Air and Sea Exercise (JASEX) with the USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) Strike Group, U.S. Air Force 18th Wing, 5th Air Force and I Marine Air Wing.

August 15, The "Golden Gator" arrived in Sasebo, Japan, for a two-day port call after wrapping up the third annual Joint Air and Sea Exercise (JASEX) on Aug. 13.

August 25, The Boxer pulled into Majuro, Marshall Islands, for a four-day port visit; Moored at Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to embark "Tigers" from Sept. ?-7.

September 14, USS Boxer returned to San Diego after a four-and-a-half month deployment.

October 8, The Boxer pulled into San Francisco for a four-day port visit to participate in the annual Fleet Week celebration.

December 8, Capt. Bruce W. Nichols relieved Capt. Thomas J. Culora as CO of the Boxer during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

December 12, LHD 4 departed homeport for three days of shipboard training and flight deck qualifications.

January 16, 2006 USS Boxer is currently underway off the coast of southern California as a test platform for the Unit Level Training and Assessment program. ULTRA is designed to test the ship's various training teams' capabilities and readiness.

June 6, The amphibious assault ship is currently underway off the coast of southern California for routine training; Underway for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) from July 1?-28; Underway for a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) on Aug. 1?.

September 13, USS Boxer departed Naval Station San Diego for a scheduled deployment, with the 15th MEU, in support of the Global War on Terrorism.

September 23, LHD 4 ESG, along with USS Greenville (SSN 772), conducted Undersea Warfare Exercise (USWEX) in the waters around the Hawaiian Islands from Sept. 19-22. This was the fourth such USWEX that CTF 12 has coordinated so far this year. Expeditionary Strike Group Five, commanded by Rear Adm. Mark W. Balmert, pulled into Pearl Harbor on Sept. 22 to transfer command from Balmert to Capt. David Angood, commodore of Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 5.

October 12, The Boxer moored at Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a scheduled port visit.

October 25, USS Boxer Expeditionary Strike Group and the Indian navy's western Fleet commenced exercise Malabar 2006, while underway off the southwest coast of India; Inport Mumbai, India, from Oct. 31- Nov. 3.

November 8, The Boxer ESG entered the U.S. Cental Command AoR in support of maritime security operations (MSO).

November 19, The amphibious assault ship anchored at Sitrah Anchorage for a two-day port visit to Manama, Bahrain; Inport Manama again from Dec. 30- Jan. 8.

January 28, 2007 USS Boxer moored at Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a five-day liberty visit to Dubai; Inport Manama again from Feb. 20-25.

April 14, The 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) completed its return to the Boxer Expeditionary Strike Group, after conducting security operations in Iraq since mid-November. The first group arrived on Boxer on April 8. It took several more days to complete the return of nearly 2,000 Marines.

April 29, The Boxer pulled into Fremantle, Australia, for a four-day liberty port visit; Inport Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, from May 22-2?.

May 23, Capt. Matthew J. McCloskey relieved Capt. Bruce W. Nichols as CO of the LHD 4 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship in Pearl Harbor.

May 31, USS Boxer returned to San Diego after a nearly nine-month extended deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR.

July 13, The amphibious assault ship recently departed homeport to offload ammunition off the coast of Camp Pendleton.

December 12, The Boxer returned to Naval Base San Diego after a two-day underway for sea trials, following a twelve-week Phased Maintenance Availability (PMA).

From January 10-16, 2008, USS Boxer was underway off the southern California coast preparing for its upcoming series of Unit Level Training Assessments (ULTRA) in February.

February 29, Rear Adm. Kevin M. Quinn relieved Vice Adm. Terrance T. Etnyre as a temporary Commander, Naval Surface Forces during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Boxer.

March 13, The "Golden Gator" completed a six-day certifications for flight deck and well deck operations while underway off the coast of southern California.

April 28, USS Boxer, along with various embarked units and non-governmental organizations (NGO), departed homeport en route to Latin America nations in support of the Pacific Phase of Continuing Promise (CP) 2008.

May 6, The amphibious assault ship arrived in Puerto Quetzal, Guatemala, for a 12-day port visit.

May 19, LHD 4 pulled into Acajutla, El Salvador, for the second stop of Continuing Promise '08; Inport Callao, Peru, from June 7-?; Returned to San Diego on June 26.

September 13, Capt. Mark E. Cedrun relieved Capt. Matthew J. McCloskey as commanding officer of the USS Boxer during a ceremony aboard the ship.

September 19, USS Boxer returned to homeport after a four-day underway in the SOCAL Op. Area, during which the crew conducted training and tested a new shipboard missile guidance system. The ship was fitted with a prototype electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) camera integrated into the missile director system to acquire and engage targets. The system is the first of its kind in the Navy and was used during the underway to successfully fire three RIM-7 NATO Sea Sparrow missiles.

October 16, The Boxer ESG completed their ten days Expeditionary Strike Group Integration (ESGINT) exercise, off the coast of southern California, in preparation for the upcoming deployment early next year. Marine Medium Helicopter (HMM) Squadron 163 (Reinforced), embarked aboard the Boxer, is among the first squadrons to operate the new Bell UH-1Y "Huey" helicopter.

December 1, LHD 4 departed homeport for a Certification Exercise (CERTEX) with the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit.

January 9, 2009 USS Boxer departed San Diego for a scheduled deployment to the western Pacific and Arabian Gulf.

February 19, The amphibious assault ship recently anchored off Phuket, Thailand, for a liberty port visit.

March 8, USS Boxer assumed the role as flagship for Combined Task Force (CTF) 151, after arriving in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AoR).

March 13, A fire broke out on the flight deck of USS Boxer at approximately 4:15 p.m., while refueling an AH-1W Super Cobra in the Gulf of Aden. Two Sailors sustained light injuries and are expected to make a full recovery within the week.

April 5, Rear Adm. Michelle Howard relieved Rear Adm. Terry McKnight as commander of Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 2, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Boxer. In 1999, taking the helm of USS Rushmore (LSD 47), Howard became the first African-American woman to command a U.S. Navy ship.

April 13, A 28-foot lifeboat from the U.S.-flagged container ship Maersk Alabama is hoisted aboard USS Boxer to be processed for evidence after the successful rescue of Capt. Richard Phillips. He was held captive by suspected Somali pirates in the lifeboat in the Indian Ocean for five days after a failed hijacking attempt off the Somali coast.

May 19, The Boxer Amphibious Ready Group and 13th MEU began a weeklong ARG/Marine Expeditionary Unit Exercise (MEUEX) in the Gulf of Aden and ashore at Camp Lemonier in Djibouti.

June 25, LHD 4 ARG anchored off the coast of Phuket for another liberty visit to Thailand; Moored at Naval Station Pearl Harbor from July 17-2?.

August 1, USS Boxer moored at Naval Base San Diego following a seven-month deployment in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO).

January 22, 2010 Capt. Frank J. Michael relieved Capt. Mark E. Cedrun as CO of the Boxer during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

April 1, LHD 4 departed dry-dock at the National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO) shipyard, following a four-month Drydocking Planned Maintenance Availability (DPMA).

June 10, The "Golden Gator" moored at Naval Base San Diego after underway sea trials off the coast of southern California; Underway again on July ?.

September 19, The amphibious assault ship is currently underway for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment.

October 1, USS Boxer rendered assistance to sixteen passengers of a distressed boat found off the West Coast. The fiberglass motorboat had experienced engine problems on the night of Sept. 30 and had been stranded for 14 hours until lookouts aboard the Boxer spotted it.

October 16, LHD 4 is currently underway for Amphibious Squadron (Phibron)/Marine Expeditionary Unit Integration Training (PMINT), with the 13th MEU; Underway for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) on Nov. 4; Underway for a Certification Exercise (CERTEX) on Dec. ?; Underway for routine training on Feb. 1?.

February 22, 2011 USS Boxer ARG departed Naval Base San Diego for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

March 1, LHD 4 pulled into Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam for a routine port call; Entered the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AoR) on March 24; Inport Salalah, Oman, from March 31- April 3.

July 14, Capt. Kevin P. Flanagan relieved Capt. Frank J. Michael as CO of USS Boxer during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship, while underway in the Gulf of Aden.

July 29, Search operations for Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive) 2nd Class Matthew Bergman concluded at 6:22 p.m. local time, in the Gulf of Aden. He was reported missing July 26 after did not report for watch and a search of the ship failed to locate him.

August 22, The Boxer ARG anchored off the coast of Phuket, Thailand, for a three-day liberty port visit; Inport Hong Kong from Aug. 31- Sept. 4; Moored at Apra Harbor, Guam, from Sept. 9-1?.

September 20, The Boxer Amphibious Ready Group pulled into Pearl Harbor for a scheduled port visit to embark "Tigers."

September 30, USS Boxer returned to San Diego after a seven-month deployment.

December 14, The Defense Department has awarded General Dynamics NASSCO about $15 million to perform repairs and upgrades on the USS Boxer. The amphibious assault ship recently returned to homeport after conducting a post-deployment ammunition offload, off the coast of southern California. The work will be completed by May 2012.

January 11, 2012 The Boxer commenced a four-and-a-half month Planned Maintenance Availability (PMA).

July 19, Vice Adm. Thomas H. Copeman, III relieved Vice Adm. Richard W. Hunt as Commander, Naval Surface Forces (SURFOR) and Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet (SURFPAC), during a change-of-command ceremony on board the LHD 4.

August 27, USS Boxer departed Naval Base San Diego for flight deck certification in the SOCAL Op. Area. Underway for sea trials and certification from Sept. 25-27; Underway again from Oct. 1-3 and on Oct. 9.

October 18, The Boxer conducted ammunition onload with the USS Makin Island (LHD 8) and Naval Weapons Station Fallbrook, Calif., while anchored off Camp Pendleton, from Oct. 15-17; Underway for flight deck certification on Oct. 29; Underway for routine training on Nov. 13 or earlier; Underway for ammo onload from Dec. 3-7.

January 11, 2013 Capt. John E. Gumbleton relieved Capt. Kevin P. Flanagan as CO of the Boxer during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship at sea.

February 4, The amphibious assault ship departed Naval Base San Diego to participate in exercise Iron Fist 2013 with elements from the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) and the Japanese Ground Self-Defense Force (JGSDF), off the coast of southern California, through Feb. 15.

From March 19-20, USS Boxer was anchored off Camp Pendleton for ammo onload.

June 11, The Boxer ARG departed San Diego for a 17-day underway to conduct Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON)/Marine Expeditionary Unit Integration Training (PMINT), with the 13th MEU, embedded into a multinational amphibious exercise Dawn Blitz 2013, with the 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade (MEB), Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) and Royal Canadian Navy ships.

July 8, LHD 4 departed Naval Base San Diego for an 11-day Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Underway for CERTEX from July 26- Aug. 7.

August 23, USS Boxer departed homeport for a scheduled deployment. She is the first West Coast-based amphibious assault ship to deploy with MV-22 Osprey aircraft aboard.

August 29, The Boxer ARG arrived off the coast of Hawaii to participate in an amphibious training exercise, from Aug. 30- Sept. 1.

September 16, USS Boxer moored at Alava Pier in Subic Bay, Philippines, for a four-day port call before participating in at-sea phase of Amphibious Landing Exercise (PHIBLEX) 2014.

October 2, The amphibious assault ship moored at Berth 3/4, Changi Naval Base for a three-day port visit to Singapore. The ARG arrived in the Central Command AoR on Oct. 12.

October 24, LHD 4 commenced offload of Marines and equipment at Arta Beach, Djibouti, for a month-long sustainment training exercises with the French military.

October 31, The Boxer participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with the Royal Navy’s Response Force Task Group (RFTG) flagship HMS Illustrious (R 06), south of Salalah, Oman; Inport Salalah from Nov. 2-6; Entered the Arabian Gulf on Nov. 27.

December 14, USS Boxer departed Jebel Ali, U.A.E., after a week-long upkeep.

January 15, 2014 The Boxer moored at Khalifa Bin Salman Port, Bahrain, for a five-day port call in conjunction with Bahrain International Airshow.

February 8, USS Boxer moored at Aqaba Naval Base, Jordan, for a four-day port call to conduct agricultural counter-measure washdowns of all embarked equipment.

February 12, USS Boxer moored at Container Terminal in Port of Eilat, Israel, for a five-day port visit; Departed the Central Command (CENTCOM) Area of Operation (AoO) on March 11.

March 18, The amphibious assault ship moored at Berth 3/4, Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a three-day port call.

March 30, The Boxer ARG is currently participating in annual combined exercise Ssang Yong, off the coast of Pohang, with the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) ARG and the Republic of Korea (ROK) Flotilla Five.

April 15, LHD 4 moored at Berth K10-11 in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a two-day port call to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise.

April 25, USS Boxer returned to Naval Base San Diego after an eight-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR.

June 2, General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. (NASSCO) was awarded a $20,7 million modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-13-C-4404) for the USS Boxer's Phased Maintenance Availability (PMA).

June 3, The Boxer is currently underway for ammo offload off the coast of Camp Pendleton, Calif.

July 2, Capt. Wayne R. Brown relieved Capt. John E. Gumbleton as the 14th CO of Boxer during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at Pier 13, Naval Base San Diego.

September 29, General Dynamics NASSCO was awarded a $36,2 million modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-13-C-4404) for the USS Boxer's PMA.

September 29, Rear Adm. Frank L. Ponds, Commander, Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 3, relieved of his duty Capt. Wayne Brown as the results of a command investigation into Equal Opportunity concerns. Capt. Keith Moore, deputy commodore of PHIBRON 1, assumed temporary command of the LHD 4.

October 31, Capt. Martin L. Pompeo relieved Capt. Keith G. Moore as commanding officer of the USS Boxer.

February 23, 2015 The Boxer moved from Pier 13 to Pier 2 at Naval Base San Diego; Underway for sea trials and flight deck certification from March 18-26; Anchored south off Coronado from March 26-29; Anchored off Camp Pendleton for ammo onload from March 30- April 1; Returned home on April 3.

April 30, USS Boxer departed San Diego for well deck and flight deck certifications; Anchored off Coronado from May 3-4 and 8-10; Moored at Berth 5, Pier 8 on May 12; Underway for routine training from June 1-5.

June 5, Capt. Michael S. Ruth relieved Capt. Martin L. Pompeo as CO of the Boxer during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at Pier 8.

July 23, LHD 4 departed homeport en route to Seattle, Wash., after a six-week Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV); Moored at Naval Station Everett from July 27-28.

July 28, USS Boxer moored at Pier 90 in Port of Seattle for a six-day visit to participate in annual Seafair Fleet Week celebration; Returned to San Diego on Aug. 7.

August 31, The Boxer departed Naval Base San Diego for an 11-day underway to participate in annual amphibious landing exercise Dawn Blitz, off the coast of Camp Pendleton, with the USS New Orleans (LPD 18), USS Somerset (LPD 25), USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49), SS Curtis (T-AVB 4), USS Shoup (DDG 86), USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110), JS Hyuga (DDH 181), JS Kunisaki (LST 4003), JS Ashigara (DDG 178), ARM Usumacinta (A412), ARM Revolucion (P164) and the 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade (MEB).

September 25, USS Boxer departed homeport for a week-long underway to participate in Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 1/Marine Expeditionary Unit Integration Training (PMINT), with the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU); Underway for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment on Oct. 6.

October 19, The Boxer ARG departed San Diego for an 18-day underway to participate in a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Task Group Exercise (TGEX) with the Royal Canadian Navy ships.

November 9, The amphibious assault ship departed homeport for a routine training in the SOCAL Op. Area; Anchored south off Coronado from Nov. 14-15; Moored at Berth 5, Pier 8 on Nov. 16; Underway for a Certification Exercise (CERTEX) from Dec. 3-16; Underway for a Sustainment Exercise (SUSTEX) and MISSILEX from Jan. 15-22.

February 12, 2016 USS Boxer departed Pier 8, Naval Base San Diego for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

February 19, The Boxer ARG arrived off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii, for a sustainment training exercise at Bellows Training Area; Entered the U.S. 7th Fleet AoO on Feb. 27.

March 8, USS Boxer ARG joined the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 7 and the Republic of Korea (ROK) Flotilla Five, for a photographic exercise (PHOTOEX) off the east coast of Korea, before participating in amphibious landing exercise Ssang Yong 2016, as part of the annual joint exercise Foal Eagle; Anchored off Pohang from March 10-14; Transited the Taiwan Strait southbound on March 20.

March 21, The Boxer anchored at Western Anchorage #2 in Victoria Harbour for a four-day liberty port visit to Hong Kong; Transited the Strait of Singapore on March 29; Entered the U.S. Central Command Area of Operations (AoO) on April 4.

April 10, LHD 4 commenced offload of Marines and equipment at Arta Beach, Djibouti, for sustainment training exercises with the French military; Transited the Strait of Hormuz northbound on June 5.

June 7, USS Boxer moored at Berth 13, Mina Salman Port in Manama, Bahrain, for a four-day liberty visit.

June 16, AV-8B Harriers, assigned to the "Black Sheep" of Marine Attack Squadron (VMA) 214 Detachment, conducted their first combat missions in Iraq, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.

June 23, The Boxer moored at Berth 58, Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a week-long liberty visit to Dubai.

July 7, Capt. Patrick V. Foege relieved Capt. Keith G. Moore as Commander, Amphibious Squadron (COMPHIBRON) 1 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the USS Boxer, while underway in the Arabian Gulf.

July 15, USS Boxer departed Arabian Gulf after transiting the Strait of Hormuz southbound.

July 16, The Boxer moored at Berth 2 in Port of Sultan Qaboos for a four-day liberty visit to Muscat, Oman; Transited the Strait of Malacca southbound from July 29-30.

July 30, USS Boxer moored at Berth 3/4, Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a five-day liberty port visit; Participated in a Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the HMAS Success (AOR 304) on Aug. 4.

August 9, USS Boxer moored at Sepanggar Naval Base, Malaysia, for a four-day port visit to Kota Kinabalu; Transited the Balabac Strait on Aug. 14; Entered the U.S. 3rd Fleet AoR on Aug. 25.

August 29, The amphibious assault ship moored at Wharf K10/K11 on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, for a four-day port visit and to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise; Offload off Camp Pendleton, Calif., from Sept. 9-10.

September 12, USS Boxer moored at Berth 5, Pier 8 on Naval Base San Diego following a seven-month deployment.

October 19, LHD 4 departed homeport for burials at sea, amphibious operations with the 3rd Assault Amphibian Battalion (AABN) and to offload ordnance at the NWS Fallbrook; Anchored off Camp Pendleton North from Oct. 24-26; Moored at Berth 5, Pier 8 on Oct. 27.

October 28, General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. (NASSCO) was awarded a $83 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-13-C-4404) for the Phased Maintenance Availability (PMA) of USS Boxer. Work is expected to be completed by October 2017.

December 8, Capt. Benjamin J. Allbritton relieved Capt. Michael S. Ruth as the 17th CO of Boxer during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at Pier 8.

December 13, USS Boxer moved "dead-stick" from Naval Base San Diego to Berth 4 at NASSCO shipyard.

October 4, 2017 The Boxer moved "dead-stick" from NASSCO shipyard to Berth 6, Pier 7 on Naval Base San Diego.

December 1, Capt. Brad L. Arthur relieved Capt. Michael A. Crary as Commander, Amphibious Squadron (COMPHIBRON) 5 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Boxer.

March 2, 2018 USS Boxer suffered a major electrical fire while underway off the coast of southern California. There were no injuries, but the damage to the ship’s compartments and systems were extensive.

March 5, The Boxer moored at Berth 5, Pier 2 on Naval Base San Diego after a six-day underway for sea trials.

July 19, Capt. Ronald A. Dowdell relieved Capt. Benjamin J. Allbritton as CO of the Boxer during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

August 17, The Boxer moored at Berth 5, Pier 2 after a 17-day underway, off the coast of southern California, for routine training and flight deck certification; Underway again on Sept. 23.

From September 24-27, the Boxer was anchored off the coast of Camp Pendleton North to onload ammunition from the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) and NWS Fallbrook; Conducted DLQs with two AV-8B Harriers, assigned to the Marine Attack Squadron (VMA) 214, on Sept. 29.

October 4, USS Boxer conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Yukon (T-AO 202), while underway southwest of San Clemente Island; Conducted well deck certification from Oct. 9-11.?

October 17, The Boxer moored at Berth 6, Pier 7 on Naval Base San Diego; Underway again from Oct. 19-26 and Nov. 6-9; Underway for a Surface Warfare Advanced Tactical Training (SWATT) exercise from Dec. 15-19.

January 15, 2019 USS Boxer departed homeport to participate in Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 5/Marine Expeditionary Unit Integration Training (PMINT), with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU); Participated in a missile exercise (MISSILEX) on Jan. 29; Moored at Berth 6, Pier 7 on Jan. 31; Underway for ARG/MEUEX from Feb. 12-28.

April 1, LHD 4 moored at Berth 6, Pier 2 on Naval Base San Diego after a 19-day underway for Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

May 1, USS Boxer departed San Diego for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

May 10, The Boxer ARG recently arrived off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii, for a sustainment training exercise at the Bellows Training Area; Moored at Wharf K10/K11 on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam from May 14-16.

May 27, US Boxer conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Richard E. Byrd (T-AKE 4), while underway northwest of Guam; Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Guadalupe (T-AO 200) on May 28; Transited the Surigao Strait southbound on June 1; Transited the Singapore Strait westbound on June 5.

June 7, USS Boxer participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the FS Charles de Gaulle (R91), FS Latouche-Treville (D646), FS Provence (D652) and FS Marne (A630), while underway in the Andaman Sea; Anchored off Phuket, Thailand, from June 8-13; Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Washington Chambers (T-AKE 11), while underway in the Bay of Bengal, on June 17.

June 27, The Boxer ARG recently arrived in the Gulf of Aden for Maritime Security Operations (MSO); Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198) and USNS Cesar Chavez (T-AKE 14) on June 30.

July 2, Capt. Jason A. Burns relieved Capt. Brad L. Arthur as Commander, Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 5 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Boxer.

July 5, The Boxer ARG conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO 199) and USNS Cesar Chavez, while underway in the Gulf of Aden; Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8) and USNS Tippecanoe, while underway in the North Arabian Sea, on July 14; Transited the Strait of Hormuz northbound, escorted by USS Bainbridge (DDG 96), on July 18.

July 19, USS Boxer, along with the USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49), conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Big Horn, while underway in the Central Arabian Gulf; Commenced offload of Marines and equipment, while anchored off Kuwait Naval Base, for a sustainment training on July 21; Conducted a replenishment-at-sea again on July 24.

July 25, USS Boxer moored at Berth 6, Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) in Hidd, Bahrain, for an eight-day upkeep and a liberty visit to Manama; Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Tippecanoe and USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3) on Aug. 10; Transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound on Aug. 12; Transited the Bab el-Mandeb Strait northbound on Aug. 18.

August 21, LHD 4 transited the Strait of Tiran northbound in support of the annual multinational exercise Eager Lion 2019; Moored at Aqaba Naval Base, Jordan, from Aug. 29-31; Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Tippecanoe, while underway in the northern Red Sea, on Sept. 6; Transited the Bab el-Mandeb Strait southbound on Sept. 13.

September 15, Capt. Roger D. Heinken, Jr., relieved Capt. Ronald A. Dowdell as CO of the Boxer during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship, while underway in the Gulf of Aden.

September 17, The Boxer ARG conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Tippecanoe and USNS Cesar Chavez, while underway in the Gulf of Aden; Departed the Central Command Area of Operations (AoO) on Sept. 23.

September 26, USS Boxer conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Washington Chambers, while underway off the north coast of Sumatra; Transited the Malacca Strait southbound on Sept. 27; Transited the Singapore Strait eastbound on Sept. 28; Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204) on Sept. 28.

October 2, The Boxer arrived off the coast of Sabah, Malaysia, to participate in a joint amphibious exercise Tiger Strike 2019; Participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) CSG on Oct. 6; Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Rappahannock, while underway in the South China Sea, on Oct. 9 and 16th.

October 26, The Boxer conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Pecos (T-AO 197), while underway in the Philippine Sea; Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Rappahannock and USNS Washington Chambers, while underway approximately 50 n.m. northwest of Guam, on Oct. 29; Moored at Berth 2/3, Tango Wharf in Apra Harbor from Oct. 30- Nov. 4.

November 13, The amphibious assault ship moored at Pier H3 on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, for a five-day port visit and to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise; Arrived off Camp Pendleton for offload on Nov. 24.

November 27, USS Boxer moored at Berth 6, Pier 13 on Naval Base San Diego following a seven-month deployment.

January 23, 2020 The Boxer returned to homeport after a two-day underway off the coast of southern California; Underway again from Jan. 28-29 and Feb. 18-21; Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on March 6.

March 27, BAE Systems San Diego Ship Repair was awarded a $200,3 million contract for the execution of the USS Boxer's Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA). Work is expected to be completed by December 2021.

April 30, The Boxer departed Naval Base San Diego for routine operations off the coast of southern California; Anchored off Camp Pendleton North for ammo offload from May 2-7; Moored at Berth 5, Pier 13 on May 8.

June 30, USS Boxer recently entered the Pride of California Dry Dock on BAE Systems shipyard.

February 11, 2021 Capt. Kathleen M. Ellis relieved Capt. Roger D. Heinken, Jr., as the 20th CO of Boxer during a change-of-command ceremony on board the USS Midway Museum.

August 5, USS Boxer undocked, on late Thursday evening, and moored at Berth 6, Pier 2 on Naval Base San Diego.

Sours: http://www.uscarriers.net/lhd4history.htm

USS BOXER HISTORY

USS Boxer (CV-21, CVA-21, CVS-21 and LPH-4), 1945-1969

USS Boxer, a 27,100-ton Essex class aircraft carrier, was built at Newport News, Virginia. Commissioned on April 16, 1945, she did not complete initial training in time to participate in World War II operations, but was actively employed in the Pacific during the Post-War years, making ten deployments to the Western Pacific from September 1945 into 1957. Boxer had just returned to the U.S. from her third deployment when the Korean War broke out in late June 1950.  She carried badly-needed Air Force and Navy planes and personnel to the war zone in a record Pacific transit during July, then was quickly outfitted for combat service and spent September and October 1950 providing air support for United Nations' forces fighting ashore.

Boxer made three more Korean War cruises, in March-October 1951, March-September 1952 and May-November 1953. Her planes, along with those from other Task Force 77 carriers, hit transportation and infrastructure targets in North Korea and gave close air support to troops fighting on the front lines. On 5 August 1952, while engaged in combat operations, she suffered damage and casualties when a fire broke out in her hangar deck, but was able to return to duty off Korea after two weeks of repairs. Following her last Korean War deployment, which extended into the post-Armistice period, Boxer served as a Seventh Fleet attack carrier (CVA) on two more cruises, in 1954 and in 1955-56. Converted to an anti-submarine warfare aircraft carrier (CVS) in early 1956, she made a final Western Pacific tour in that role during 1956-57.

Later in 1957, Boxer operated briefly as an experimental assault helicopter aircraft carrier, an indication of things to come for her, the Navy and the Marine Corps. In 1958, she was flagship for Operation "Hardtack", a nuclear weapons test program in the Central Pacific. Late in that year, she was transferred to the Atlantic Fleet as an "interim amphibious assault ship" and was formally redesignated LPH-4 on 30 January 1959.

For the next decade, Boxer and her "main battery" of Marines and transport helicopters were vital components of the United States' amphibious warfare capabilities. She mainly operated in the Caribbean area, including participation in the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis and the 1965 Dominican Republic intervention. She deployed to European waters in late 1964 to participate in Operation "Steel Pike". In mid-1965, Boxer served as an aircraft transport, carrying more than two-hundred Army helicopters and airplanes to Vietnam as part of the deployment of the First Cavalry Division (Air Mobile). After serving as a spacecraft recovery vessel in early 1966, she made a second trip to Vietnam, this time carrying Marine Corps aircraft. Boxer was decommissioned in December 1969 and was sold for scrap in February 1971.

The Boxer of the 21st Century

The sixth ship to carry the name BOXER would be the fourth ship of the new Wasp Class Multi-purpose Assault Ship (LHD). Fabrication work for LHD4 began at Litton-Ingalls in Pascagoula, Mississippi on July 9, 1990. The ship's keel was authenticated on April 08, 1991 and the ship was launched on August 13, 1993. The ship was official christened the USS Boxer (LHD 4) on August 28, 1993. After post-launch outfitting and testing, Ingalls delivered the ship to the U.S. Navy on November 21, 1994. On February 11, 1995, the USS Boxer (LHD-4) was officially commissioned into the United States Navy as its fourth Multipurpose Amphibious Assault Ship, almost four years after construction on her began. The Boxer began an extensive workup period which included the ships maiden voyage from Pascagoula, Mississippi to San Diego, California through the Panama Canal. Barely small enough to fit through the Canal, Boxer arrived in San Diego, CA on March 15, 1995 minus the bridge wing located on the superstructure just off the main bridge. The bridge wing along with several other minor pieces of the ship were sheared off during the narrow transit through the Canal. In October 1996, after minor repairs and complete system check-outs, Boxer began the workup cycle for its first Western Pacific (WESPAC) Deployment from March 24, 1997 to September 24, 1997. During the deployment USS Boxer Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) consisted of USS Boxer (LHD 4), USS Ogden (LPD 5), and USS Fort Fisher (LSD 40) with Commander Amphibious Squadron Seven (CPR-7) and 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) embarked. Boxer ARG participated in several foreign relations exercises during the deployment with Singapore, United Arab Emirates and Jordan. The Boxer also showed the American flag abroad by visiting Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, Eritrea, Indonesia and Australia. It had been the first time a ship named "Boxer" had been deployed overseas in 27 years. Returning to San Diego on September 24, 1997, Boxer began it first Planned Maintenance Availability (PMA) and training period. However, in June 1998, Boxer departed for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii to take place in one of the U.S. Navy's largest joint naval exercises called RIMPAC. For over a month the Boxer's Marine assault forces use the ship as a springboard to carry out mock amphibious landings by using Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC), conventional landing craft and helicopters to move troops onto the beaches. These landings were carried out for over a month while Boxer operated just off the coast of Hawaii, supporting Marines ashore and providing Harrier jets for close air support. Arriving in port San Diego on July 13, 1998, Boxer immediately began its second work-up cycle in preparation for a second WESPAC to begin in December 1998. Just 15 months after the first WESPAC, Boxer departed on its second overseas deployment on December 05, 1998. The CPR-7 continued to serve as USS Boxer Amphibious Ready Group's (ARG) embarked staff, however, the 15th MEU was replaced by the 13th MEU. Boxer ARG's support ships consisted this time of the USS Cleveland (LPD 7), and USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49). Boxer ARG again participated in several foreign relations exercises during the deployment with Singapore, United Arab Emirates and Kuwait. However, just days after Boxer ARG departed San Diego, the U.S. Navy launched attacks into Iraq during "Operation Desert Fox." Boxer arrived in the Arabian Gulf Theater only after the hostilities subsided, however, Boxer ARG was dispatch to the Red Sea when the war between Eritrea and Ethiopia threatened to cause the evacuation of U.S. Citizens. After 58 days underway, hostilities between the two African countries calmed down and Boxer ARG was able to continue with its deployment. The Boxer also again showed the American flag abroad like its first deployment by visiting Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, Kenya, Indonesia and Australia. Returning to San Diego on June 05, 1999, Boxer began it second Planned Maintenance Availability (PMA) and training period. Presently, Boxer is already beginning its third work-up cycle in preparation for its third WESPAC that will take place in March 2001; 21 months after its second deployment.

USS BOXER CV21/CVA21/CVS21/LPH4

COMMANDING OFFICERS

DONALD F. SMITH             CAPT. USN              APR 1945      JUN 1946

ROBERT H. HUNTER        CAPT. USN              JUN 1946      JUL 1947

S.C. RING                             CAPT. USN              JUL 1947      JUL 1948

STEADMAN TELLER        CAPT. USN              JUL 1948      JUL 1949

JOHN B. MOSS                   CAPT. USN              JUL 1949      JUL 1950

CAMERON BRIGGS           CAPT. USN              JUL 1950      AUG 1951

DENNIS J. SULLIVAN       CAPT. USN              AUG 1951     AUG 1952

MARSHALL B. GURNEY  CAPT. USN              AUG 1952     AUG 1953

B. E. MOORE                       CAPT. USN              AUG 1953     JUL 1954

JAMES R. MILLS, JR.        CAPT. USN              JUL 1954      AUG 1955

FRANK B. MILLER             CAPT. USN              AUG 1955     SEP 1956

WILLIAM P. WOODS          CAPT. USN              SEP 1956      OCT 1957

JAMES E. VOSE                 CAPT. USN              OCT 1957      DEC 1957

IRVIN L. DEW                      CAPT. USN              DEC 1957     DEC 1959

EDWIN B. PARKER           CAPT. USN              DEC 1959     DEC 1960

EDGAR E. STEBBINS       CAPT. USN              DEC 1960     FEB 1962

JAMES B. WALLACE        CAPT. USN              FEB 1962      JAN 1963

EDWARD T. DEACON       CAPT. USN              JAN 1963      JAN 1964

CHARLES S. WALLINE    CAPT. USN              JAN 1964      JAN 1965

WALTER M. SESSUMS     CAPT. USN              JAN 1965      DEC 1965

ALBERT O. MORTON        CAPT. USN              DEC 1965     JAN 1967

HENRY J. COOKE              CAPT. USN              JAN 1967      FEB 1968

R. F. HUNT                           CAPT. USN              FEB 1968      MAR 1969

LESTER B. LAMPMAN      CAPT. USN              MAR 1969     DEC 1969

EVENTS IN SERVICE

The following chronology covers the USS BOXER CV21/CVA21/CVS21/LPH4/LHD4.

This page is under construction.  As information is developed, updates will be made.  Webmaster www.ussboxer.org

1943
430913 Built at Newport News SB & DD Co. Date keel laid

1944
441214  Launch: Ruth D.Overton, daughter.- Sen. John H. Overton, LA
441214  Launching: Huge bow poster reads "HERE WE GO TO TOKYO"
441214  Named: Captured British ship in 1813 by USS ENTERPRISE

1945
450129  Geometric ship's aircraft ID, 2 chevrons pointing down
450416  Commissioned at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth
450416  Ship's patch insignia in color, HOOK Winter 84
450416  NXOP, Ship signal flag and radio call sign issued
450416  New CO: Smith, Donald F. 1st CO
450416  Nickname : BUSY BEE, (1st-SHOWBOAT)
450500 -- 450600 : est. Shakedown cruise to Guantanamo Bay 6/16
450500  CVG-93 attached to Aug 45, squadrons in file
450718 -- 450729 : Norfolk, Panama Canal (7/23), San Diego home
450723  Panama Canal transit, Atlantic to Pacific, enroute San Diego
450727  Carrier aircraft ship assignment code, ZZ
450729  Homeport : San Diego, to end of CVS service
450812  Open House held at Hunters Point, San Francisco NSY
450901 -- 460909 : 1st WestPac cruise. San Diego, Guam, Yellow Sea
450901  Air Group 93 / Air Group 80, Tail code ZZ
450911  Operates from Guam as flagship of Task Force 77
450929 --460510 : Navy Occupation Service Medal for 3 periods
451007  China Coast Service Medal dates; to 4 Jun 46

1946
460510  Navy Occupation Service Medal in Asiatic waters
460600  New CO: Hunter, Robert H.
460909  During cruise at Manila for Philippine Independence celebrations
460909  Port calls : Tsingtao, Japan, Hong Kong, Guam, Saipan, Okinawa, Manila
461107  Carrier aircraft ship assignment code, B

1947
470700  New CO : Ring, Stanhope C. Previously last CO of SARATOGA, CV-3

1948
480310  1st jet operates routinely from Essex class, off California, FJ-1, VF-5A
480400  Cruise to Pearl Harbor
480700 -- 480800 : Midshipmen cruise to Pearl Harbor
480700  New CO: Teller, Steadman
481027  Navy Day celebration at Santa Monica, CA

1949
490113 -- 490225 : Gulf of Alaska, Kodiak Island for cold weather ops / tests
490301  Cruise to Pearl Harbor via San Diego
490400 Overhaul period in Hunters Pt., San Francisco Naval Yard
490700 New CO: Moss, John B.
490720 Ship dinner/dance at Veterans Memorial Hall, Oakland,CA

1950
500111  -- 500613 : 2nd WestPac cruise. So. China Sea, ret.  Alameda
500111  CVG-19 embarked, Tail code B
500129 -- 500408 : Navy Occupation Service Medal for 2 periods
500129 -- 500205 & Apr 01 -05 : Navy Occupation Service Medal in Asiatic waters
500211 -- 500216 : & Apr 10-16, 1950 China Coast Service Medal
500407  Port call:  Inchon ,  Korea . To Apr 9
500408  Pres. Syngman Rhee of Korea visits ship at Inchon
500613  Port calls : Japan, Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore, Philippines
500625  Korea War outbreak status: San Diego homeport
500708  Alameda. Readies to transport 1,012 men & planes to   Japan
500717 -- 500804 : 3rd WestPac.   Alameda  . Transports planes & troops to   Japan  .
500717  Urgent transports 145 F-51D, Mustang; 6 L-5; 19 Navy. Total 170 aircraft
500717  CVG-101, Tail code A
500723 -- 500728 :  Yokosuka ,  Japan for debarkation of men, aircraft, & supplies
500728   New CO : Briggs, Cameron. At sea by high-line. Estimate date in July
500728  Editor, Report from the Boxer. OUR NAVY Mid Sept 1950. Trip report
500824 -- 501111 : 1st  Korea war cruise. Inchon ,  Wonsan landing aid.  Alameda
500824  CVG-2 embarked, Tail code M
500828  F6F-5K drone aircraft flown into  Korea combat. Controlled by AD-2Q. File
500915  Supported landings at  Inchon . 8 Korea battle stars, part of TF 77
501009  Supports  Wonsan Harbor,  Korea capture with CVs-32,45,& 47
501111  Korea Service Medal (wartime duty off Korean coasts)
501111  Spellout as arrives at  San Francisco " BOXER "
501114 -- 501222 : Minor overhaul at San Francisco NSY after cruise

1951
510000  Movie `SUBMARINE COMMAND' sequences filmed aboard
510302--511024 : 2nd  Korea war cruise. China coast operations
510302  CVG-101 embarked, Tail code A (squadrons in file)
510408 -- 510415 : Patrols the Formosa Straits to counter Red China threats
510410 -- 510415 : China Service Medal for Formosa Straits operations
510800  New CO: Sullivan, Dennis J.
510901  Participates in biggest raid on N. Korea, 144 planes from 9, 21, 37
511024  Yokosuka, Japan used for several liberty calls, ship replenishment & repair
511024  Korea Service Medal (wartime duty off Korean coasts)
511223  Bob Hope aboard 12/15 & /23 for Christmas show, San Diego
511223  1st nationwide telecast live from a ship, Bob Hope, XMAS

1952
520208 -- 520926 : 3rd  Korea war cruise. Fatal fire aboard
520208  CVG-2 embarked, Tail code M (squadrons in file)
520623  Participates in Suiho,  Yalu  River power plants raid
520729  Port call:  Yokosuka . Boy Scouts tour ship, galley
520804  New CO: Gurney, Marshall B.
520806  Gas explodes in hangar while on station off Korea, 9 die, 2 critical injured
520828  Radio controlled F6F-5K launched to bomb Korean bridge
520828  1st carrier use of guided missile (F6F) into combat. HOOK Fa 90, p23
520926  Yokosuka, Japan used for several liberty calls, ship replenishment & repair
520926  ER Korea Service Medal (wartime duty off Korean coasts)
521001  AH Designated CVA-21, attack carrier

1953
530300  Editors. BATTLING BOXER FLINGS 1-2 PUNCH, POP.SCI. Mr53
530330 -- 531128 : 4th  Korea war cruise. South China Sea patrol
530330  ATG-1 embarked, Tail code Mixed
530727  8 battle stars awarded for Korea War actions
530727  Korea Service Medal, post-hostilities duty in Korean waters
530808   New CO : Moore, Benjamin E. Jr. USNA ' 27. Probably at  Sasebo,  Japan
531128  Cruise ends at  Alameda NAS
531128  Port calls: Hong Kong;  Sasebo,  Japan
531128  Korea Service Medal (wartime duty off Korean coasts)

1954
540303 -- 541011 : 8th WestPac.  Tonkin Gulf . French collapse
540303  CVG-12 embarked, Tail code D
540717   New CO : Mills, James R., USNA ' 29
541011 -- 550200 : Extensive overhaul at San Francisco NSY

1955
550603 - 560203 : 9th WestPac. Formosa Straits. HOOK, Summer 90 p30
550603  CVG-14 embarked, Tail code A. CDR A. W. Newhall
550704  July 4th spent at Yokosuka, Japan
560203  Port calls: Pearl Harbor, Yokosuka, Sasebo, Subic Bay, Hong Kong, Guam
550803  New CO: Miller, Frank B.. At  Subic Bay
551115  Designated CVS-21, anti-submarine warfare carrier
551119  Spell out: BOXER 75,000 LANDINGS. During WestPac

1956
560203   Yokosuka , Subic Bay 7/26,  Sasebo 8/22,  Hong Kong
560709 --570130 : 10th WestPac cruise. Logs 79,000th landing
560709  VS-23 and HS-4 embarked, Tail code Mixed
560813  Port call in Hong Kong ended due to   Suez  crisis.
560900  New CO: Woods, William P. USNA ' 31

1957
570315 -- 570715 : Extensive overhaul at Puget Sound NSY
571000  Participates with Marines in Helilex I, II, III
571000  New CO: Vose, James E. "Moe' Jr. USNA ' 34. WWII VB-17
571026 --571200 : Long Beach NSY. Preparations for Operation Hardtack

1958
580101  Boxer in Long Beach Naval Shipyard
580215  Departed for  Pearl Harbor
580215  HMR-361 aboard for atomic bomb test series support
580215--580828 : San Diego, CTG 7.3, Bikini atom bomb test area
580704  Rescues C-124 plane crew (4 souls) enroute Johnston Is. test area
580820  New CO: Dew, Irvin L. "Ike". USNA ' 33. Last CO as CVS 21
581014-- 581101 : San Diego, Panama Canal (10/24), Norfolk
581014  Final homeport : San Diego as CVS 21
581024  Last aircraft carrier to transit Panama Canal
581024  Panama Canal transit, Pacific to Atlantic, enroute Norfolk. Last CV transit

1959
590130  Designated LPH-4, amphibious assault ship
590131  No SCB modernizations (angled flight deck) during service as CV. FRAM as LPH
590811  New CO: Parker, Edwin B. USNA ' 35

1960
600919  New CO: Stebbins, Edgar E.

1961
620200  New CO: Wallace, James B.

1963
630100  New CO: Deacon, Edward T.

1964
640100  New CO: Walline, Charles S.

1965
650108  New CO: Sessums, William M. Capt
650200  Short periods at sea
650300  Short period at sea
650401  BOXER deploys for “Ready Squadron”
650425  BOXER ordered to Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
650426  BOXER on station for possible evacuation of US citizens
650427  Conditions require the landing of embarked troops to restore order and safeguard American lives
650500  1,000 civilians, mostly women and children were brought aboard BOXER
650629  Norfolk
650810  BOXER underway for Mayport;
650811  Arrived Mayport
650800  Army First Cavalry Division (Air Mobile) loaded aboard; 205 helicopters, 6 OV-1 Mohawk fixed wing aircraft; 1,200 Army personnel
650909  Arrive Cam Rahn Bay, South Vietnam to off-load 6 OV-1s
650910  Arrive Qui Nhon to off-load Helos over the next 5 days
650915  Arrive Cam Rahn Bay to off-load additional materials
650900--651000  Subic Bay, PI; Hong Kong, BCC; Naples, Italy; Barcelona, Spain
651028  Norfolk, VA after steaming 26,000 miles
651200 CO New CO: Morton, Albert C.

1966
660100  Pier 12 Norfolk
660200  Pier 12 Norfolk; South Atlantic as prime recovery for the first Apollo unmanned space mission; Equator crossing and Shellback initiation
660226  BOXER hoists the spacecraft aboard
660300  Pier 7 Norfolk; off Bermuda as primary recovery ship for Gemini 8 manned space shot; technical difficulties required the splashdown off Okinawa
660426  BOXER enroute to Vietnam with Helos and HMM 265;  Rota, Spain
660500  Aden-refueling ; Nha Trang; Quy Nhon; Da Nang
660600  Hong Kong; Naples, Italy; Palma, Majorca; Rota, Spain
660713  Pier 12 Norfolk
660825  Maneuvered to Portsmouth by 7 tugs due to generator failure
660912  BOXER underway Carib 3-66
660900  MEBLEX 1-66 Vieques; St. Thomas, VI; Guantanamo Bay
661000  Area of Haiti/Dominican Republic hurricane aid/relief ; Roosevelt Roads; Cristobal, Panama
661100  Kingston, Jamaica, Vieques; Culebra;  Roosevelt Roads; St. Thomas

661200  Pier 7  Norfolk


1967
670131  CO New CO: Cooke, Henry J. H. Capt.
670100  Pier 7 Norfolk
670203  Pier 11 Boston Naval Shipyard
670000  New flight deck planking; re-tube all boilers; new refractory material; new data processing system
670629  Sea trials off Cape Cod; Pier 11 Boston NSY
670715  Overhaul complete; put to sea for Norfolk
670800  re-arm; Guantanamo Bay
670900  Montego Bay, Jamaica
670911  Put to sea to avoid Hurricane Beulah
670925  Pier 12 Norfolk
671000  Onslow Beach; Mayport, FL
671100  Pierside New Orleans, LA for OPEN HOUSE, 9,000+ visitors; Pier 7 Norfolk

1968
680131 CO New CO: Hunt Robert F.
680208  BOXER suffered moderate damage to the forecastle during a storm off  Onslow Beach .
680113  BOXER deploys for Carib 1-68.
680300  Vieques; Guantanamo Bay
680400  Kingston, Jamaica; St. Thomas; St. Croix; Roosevelt Roads
680500  St. Thomas; Vieques;  Cristobal ,  Panama ; Port-of-Spain, Trinidad
680600  Pier 7  Norfolk .
680700   NAMMIDLEX Midshipmem cruise
680800  Onslow Beach; Pier 12 Norfolk
680900  Onslow Beach, Pier 12 Norfolk
681000  BOXER deploys for Carib 3-68; Onslow Beach
681100  Culebra; Vieques; Roosevelt Roads; Guantanamo Bay; St. Thomas
681200  Vieques; Christmas in Roosevelt Roads

1969
690100  Panama jungle training for Landing Force and ship’s Landing Party
690100  Cartegena, Columbia; Colon, Panama; Laguaira/Caracas Venezuela
690200  St. Thomas; Vieques, Onslow Beach; pier 7 Norfolk
690327  Pier 88 New York City
690311 CO Last CO as LPH: Lester B Lampman to Dec 1, 1969
690327  Pier 88 New York City
690700  Yard Period Newport News; Nassau, Bahamas; Guantanamo Bay, 7/20 Neil Armstrong first step on the moon.  Rescue of three Cuban children from an inner tube after two days adrift. Moved children to Guantanamo Bay
690800   Port-Au-Prince,  Haiti ; landed twin-engine, fixed wing OV-10A Bronco without arresting gear. Captain Lampman served as LSO
690800  Crew party in Virginia Capes Operating Area; Pier 7 Norfolk; COMPHIBRON EIGHT moves command to Guam; SECNAV announces BOXER to be decommissioned effective 120101.
690900  Board of Inspection and Survey recommends BOXER be stricken from the Naval Register and disposed of, with minimum cost to the government.
691201 AL Stricken from Naval Register
691201 AO Final decommissioning as LPH-4, scrapped
691201 DA Navy Dept. HISTORY OF USS BOXER CVS-21, updated, 34 pp.

Partial history of Phibron Ten

Partial history provided by Rudy Muller

1958 - Official Naval historical records show. " Amphibious Squadron Ten was established on October 22, 1958 and consisted of USS Boxer CVS-21 (Flagship), Plymouth Rock LSD-29, Fort Snelling LSD-30, Speigal Grove LSD-32 and Hermitage LSD-34 . The formation of Phibron Ten marked the Navy's designation of a tactical unit of high speed ships as an amphibious assault force capable of transporting troops, boats and helicopters over long distances and launching an amphibious attack by sea and air. There slogan was " By sea, by air anytime, anywhere".

1959  onward -  January 30, 1959 the Boxer was redesignated LPH-4 remaining with Phibron Ten and playing a major role in the development of the vertical envelopment concept of amphibious warfare and maintaining an over-the-beach assault capability. Phibron Ten operated regularly throughout the Caribbean, called at Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Haiti, Jamaica, Dominican Republic and Guantanamo Bay. On occasion the Uss Rankin AKA-130 and Desoto County LST 1171 operated with Phibron Ten.

1961 - with tensions rising with Cuba, Boxer along with ships of Phibron Ten operated in and around the waters off the coast of Cuba on constant standby for this she earned the Navy Expeditionary Medal.

1962 -  For the period June 25 to September 6, 1962, the Boxer LPH-4 participated with forces of Amphibious Squadron Ten in exercise PHIBULEX 2-62 in a disclosed location within the Caribbean, maintaining a by sea and air amphibious attack capability. During the Cuban Missile Crisis of October and November 1962 occasioned by the discovery of intermediate-range ballistic missiles in Cuba, Boxer operated in the force which was marshalled in waters, prepared for any eventuality, for this she earned the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal

1963 - Phibron Ten and various components of the 2nd Marine Battalion departed Norfolk, In late February, the squadron visited the Dominican Republic, for the the inauguration of President Juan Bosch, the county's first elected president.

 

Sours: http://www.ussboxer.com/USS_Boxer_History.htm
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LHD-4 USS Boxer Wasp class amphibious assault ship multi purpose

San Diego, California - September 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego California 2011

San Diego, California - September 2011

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Pacific Ocean 2011

Pacific Ocean - September 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pearl Harbor Hawaii 2011

Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - September 2011

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Pearl Harbor

Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - September 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pacific Ocean 2011

Pacific Ocean - September 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Indian Ocean 2011

Indian Ocean - August 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Indian Ocean 2011

Indian Ocean - August 2011

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Indian Ocean

Indian Ocean - August 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Wasp class amphibious assault ship

Indian Ocean - August 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

Indian Ocean - August 2011

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Gulf of Aden 2011

Gulf of Aden - June 2011

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Gulf of Aden 2011

Gulf of Aden - June 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Gulf of Aden

Gulf of Aden - June 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

Gulf of Aden - June 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer well deck LCAC Gulf of Aden

Gulf of Aden - May 2011

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Arabian Sea replenishment 2011

Arabian Sea - April 2011

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 and T-AO 187 USNS Henry J. Kaiser Arabian Sea 2011

Arabian Sea - April 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer replenishment at sea RAS

Arabian Sea - April 2011

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 and USNS Henry J. Kaiser

Arabian Sea - April 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer AH-1W Super Cobra

Arabian Sea - April 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer flight deck Indian Ocean 2011

Indian Ocean - March 2011

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 CH-53E Super Stallion HMM-163 REIN Indian Ocean

CH-53E Sea Stallions (HMM-163) - Indian Ocean - March 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer INdian Ocean 2011 stern gate well deck

Indian Ocean - March 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Indian Ocean

Indian Ocean - March 2011

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 South China Sea 2011

South China Sea - March 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer South China Sea

South China Sea - March 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pacific Ocean

Pacific Ocean - March 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

Pacific Ocean - March 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

Pacific Ocean - March 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pearl Harbor Hawaii 2011

Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - March 2011

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Pacific Ocean

Pacific Ocean - February 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pacific Ocean AV-8B Harrier II

Pacific Ocean - February 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego 2011

San Diego, California - February 2011

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pacific Ocean 2010

Pacific Ocean - December 2010

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Wasp class amphibious assault ship multi purpose

Pacific Ocean - December 2010

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

Pacific Ocean - December 2010

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 aircraft elevator

Pacific Ocean - December 2010

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

Pacific Ocean - December 2010

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 off California 2010

Off California - November 2010

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer well deck LCAC-65

Pacific Ocean - November 2010

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 well deck LCAC

Pacific Ocean - November 2010

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer AH-1W Super Cobras on flight deck

Pacific Ocean - November 2010

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 San Diego 2010

San Diego, California - November 2010

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego

San Diego, California - June 2010

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego dry dock 2010

San Diego, California - April 2010

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer dry dock San Diego 2010

San Diego, California - April 2010

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 well deck 2009

Pacific Ocean - July 2009

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

Pacific Ocean - July 2009

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Wasp class amphibious assault ship

Pacific Ocean - July 2009

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer LSD-45 USS Comstock Pacific Ocean 2009

Pacific Ocean - July 2009

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

Pacific Ocean - July 2009

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego

San Diego, California - September 2009

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego

San Diego, California - September 2009

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Indian Ocean 2009

Indian Ocean - April 2009

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Indian Ocean 2009

Indian Ocean - April 2009

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Guam 2009

Guam - February 2009

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Gulf of Aden 2009

Gulf of Aden - April 2009

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

Gulf of Aden - April 2009

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Gulf of Aden 2009

Gulf of Aden - March 2009

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pacific Ocean 2008

Pacific Ocean - December 2008

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pacific Ocean go navy beat army

Pacific Ocean - November 2008

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer AV-8B Harrier II HMM-163 REIN

AV-8B Harrier II (HMM-163/REIN) - Pacific Ocean - October 2008

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego 2008

San Diego, California - October 2008

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer AV-8B Harrier II Pacific Ocean 2008

Pacific Ocean - October 2008

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 San Diego 2008

San Diego, California - October 2008

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer RIM-7 Sea Sparrow live firing exercise 2008

RIM-7 Sea Sparrow missile live firing exercise - September 2008

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego

San Diego, California - April 2008

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 well deck LCAC

Pacific Ocean - March 2008

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego 2007

San Diego, California - May 2007

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer North Arabian Sea 2007

North Arabian Sea - March 2007

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

January 2007

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Persian Gulf well deck night operations 2006

Persian Gulf - December 2006

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Persian Gulf 2006

Persian Gulf - November 2006

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Arabian Sea 2006

Arabian Sea - November 2006

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Arabian Sea 2006

Arabian Sea - November 2006

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Indian Ocean 2006

Indian Ocean - October 2006

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego 2006

San Diego, California - September 2006

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 San Diego

San Diego, California - September 2006

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pacific Ocean 2006

Pacific Ocean - July 2006

 

USS Boxer LHD-4

Pacific Ocean - July 2006

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pacific Ocean 2005

Pacific Ocean - October 2005

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Francisco 2005

San Francisco, California - October 2005

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego

San Diego, California - September 2005

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Pacific Ocean 2005

Pacific Ocean - September 2005

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pearl Harbor 2005

Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - September 2005

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Pacific Ocean

Pacific Ocean - August 2005

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

Pacific Ocean - August 2005

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Shoalwater Bay Australia 2005

Shoalwater Bay, Australia - June 2005

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Australia 2005

Shoalwater Bay, Australia - June 2005

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Shoalwater Bay Australia 2005

Shoalwater Bay, Australia - June 2005

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Shoalwater Bay 2005

Shoalwater Bay, Australia - June 2005

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer LCAC well deck

Pacific Ocean - May 2005

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer LCAC well deck 2005

Pacific Ocean - May 2005

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Sasebo 2005

Sasebo, Japan - May 2005

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego 2005

San Diego, California - April 2005

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer well deck stern gate

San Diego, California - June 2004

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 San Diego 2004

San Diego, California - April 2004

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego 2004

San Diego, California - April 2004

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Arabian Gulf 2004

Arabian Gulf - February 2004

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer North Island California 2004

North Island, California - January 2004

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 San Diego 2003

San Diego, California - July 2003

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego 2003

San Diego, California - July 2003

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

San Diego, California - July 2003

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Operation Enduring Freedom OEF 2003

Operation Enduring Freedom - February 2003

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pacific Ocean 2003

Pacific Ocean - January 2003

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer San Diego 2003

San Diego, California - January 2003

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer

San Diego, California - January 2003

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer 2001

underway - September 2001

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Pearl Harbor Hawaii 2000

Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - June 2000

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer AV-8B Harrier II take off flight deck 1998

Pacific Ocean - December 1998

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer CH-46 Sea Knight Pacific Ocean 1998

Pacific Ocean - December 1998

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 off Pearl Harbor Hawaii 1998

off Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - August 1998

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer 1998

underway - January 1998

 

USS Boxer LHD-4 Pascagoula Mississippi 1994 Ingalls

Pascagoula, Mississippi - December 1994

 

LHD-4 USS Boxer Ingalls shipbuilding Pascagoula Mississippi 1993

Pascagoula, Mississippi - October 1993

 

Sours: https://www.seaforces.org/usnships/lhd/LHD-4-USS-Boxer.htm
Navy Amphibious Assault Ship Departs Naval Base – USS Boxer

USS Boxer (CV 21)

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General Characteristics Crew List Memorabilia Cruise Books Different Armament Accidents aboard the Ship History Deployments of USS Boxer Video Gallery Image Gallery end of page

- later CVA 21, CVS 21, LPH 4 -
- decommissioned -


USS BOXER was the 13th ESSEX - class aircraft carrier and the fifth ship in the Navy to bear the name. Commissioned too late to participate in World War II, the BOXER was reclassified CVA 21 on October 1, 1952; CVS 21 on February 1, 1956; and LPH 4 on January 30, 1959. Both decommissioned and stricken from the Navy list on December 1, 1969, the BOXER was sold for scrapping on March 13, 1971.

General Characteristics:Awarded: 1941
Keel laid: September 13, 1943
Launched: December 14, 1944
Commissioned: April 16, 1945
Decommissioned: December 1, 1969
Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Va.
Propulsion system: 8 boilers
Propellers: four
Aircraft elevators: three
Arresting gear cables: four
Catapults: two (retired during LPH conversion)
Length: 888.5 feet (270.8 meters)
Flight Deck Width: 129.9 feet (39.6 meters)
Beam: 93.2 feet (28.4 meters)
Draft: 30.8 feet (9.4 meters)
Displacement: approx. 40,600 tons full load
Speed: 33 knots
Planes: 80-100 planes
Crew: approx. 3448   as CVS and LPH: approx. 1000
Armament: see down below


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Crew List:

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS BOXER. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

  • Click here to view the list.

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  • Click here to see which USS BOXER memorabilia are currently for sale on ebay.

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USS BOXER Cruise Books:


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About the different armament:

  • 1945: 12 5-inch (12.7 cm) 38 caliber guns, 72 40mm guns, and 35 20mm guns
  • 1953: 12 5-inch (12.7 cm) 38 caliber guns and 44 40mm guns
  • 1959: 12 5-inch (12.7 cm) 38 caliber guns
  • 1968: 8 5-inch (12.7 cm) 38 caliber guns
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Accidents aboard USS BOXER:

DateWhereEvents
August 5, 1952off KoreaUSS BOXER suffers an explosion and fire in the hangar bay while operating off Korea, killing nine and injuring two.


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History of USS BOXER:

USS BOXER was launched 14 December 1944 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co. Newport News, Va.; sponsored by Miss Ruth D. Overton daughter of the Senator from Louisiana and commissioned 16 April 1945, Captain D. F. Smith in command.

Completed too late to take part in World War II, BOXER joined the Pacific Fleet at San Diego in August 1945. From September 1945 to 23 August 1946 she operated out of Guam as flagship of TF 77 in the western Pacific. During this tour she visited Japan, Okinawa, the Philippines and China. She returned to San Francisco 10 September 1946 and operated off the west coast engaged in normal peacetime duty until departing for the Far East 11 January 1950. After service with the 7th Fleet in the Far East during the first half of 1950, she returned to San Diego, arriving 25 June.

With the outbreak of the Korean conflict she was pressed into service to carry planes to the fighting. On 23 July 1950 she completed a record crossing of the Pacific from Alameda, Calif., to Yokosuka, Japan, in 8� days, carrying 145 P-51 Mustang and six L-5 aircraft for the Air Force, 19 Navy planes, 1,012 troops and 2,000 tons of supplies. On her return trip (27 July - 4 August), she cut the record to 7 days, 10 hours, and 36 minutes. After fast repairs she departed for the Far East 24 August, this time to join TF 77 in giving air support to the troops. Her planes supported the landing at Inchon (15 September 1950) and other ground action until November, when she departed for the west coast and overhaul.

BOXER departed San Diego for her second Korean tour 2 March 1951. Again she operated with TF 77 supporting the ground troops. On 29 March, Carrier Air Wing 101 - composed of Naval Reserve squadrons called to active duty from Dallas, Tex.; Glenview, Ill.; Memphis, Tenn.; and, Olathe, Kansas - flew its first combat mission from BOXER, the first carrier strikes by Naval Reserve units against North Korean forces. She returned to San Francisco 24 October 1951.

Sailing 8 February 1952 for her third tour in Korea, BOXER again served with TF 77. On 23 June, 35 AD Skyraiders and 35 F-9F2 Panther jets from BOXER, USS PRINCETON (CV 37) and USS PHILIPPINE SEA (CV 47), joined Air Force Thunderjets in an attack on the heavily defended hydroelectric power plant at Suiho, North Korea, the fourth largest such facility in the world. The plant was completely knocked out. The raid was part of a two-day aerial offensive against North Korea's 13 major power plants.

On 5 August 1952, BOXER had nine men killed and two seriously injured in a fire which swept the hangar deck. After emergency repairs at Yokosuka, Japan (11-23 August), BOXER returned to duty off Korea. She arrived at San Francisco 25 September and underwent repairs until March 1953.

The carrier departed for the Far East 30 March 1953 and went into action a month later. She took part in the final actions of the Korean conflict and remained in Asiatic waters until November.

BOXER was reclassified CVA 21 on 1 October 1952 and CVS 21 on 1 February 1956.

On 2 October 1958, the Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, announced the formation of a new amphibious squadron, composed of BOXER and for LSDs equipped with helicopter platforms, which would provide a highly mobile unit capable of employing Marine Corps helicopters squadrons and combat troops in the fast-landing concept of vertical envelopment. The first permanent Marine Aviation Detachment afloat was activated on board BOXER on 10 November to provide supply, maintenance, and flight deck control functions necessary to support the Marine helicopter squadrons and troops. The ship was reclassified as LPH 4 on 30 January 1959.

BOXER and two LSDs arrived off the coast of Hispanola on 29 August 1964 to provide medical aid and helicopter evacuation services to people in areas of Haiti and the Dominican Republic badly damaged by Hurricane Cleo. BOXER returned to the Dominican Republic on 27 April 1965, sending her Marines ashore while the embarked HMM-264 began an airlift in which over 1,000 U.S. nationals were evacuated to the naval task force off shore as a revolt in the country threatened their safety.

BOXER also participated in the U.S. space program. On 26 February 1966, the first unmanned spacecraft of the Apollo series, fired into suborbital flight by a Saturn 1B rocket from Cape Kennedy, Fla., was recovered in the southeast Atlantic Ocean, 200 miles east of Ascension Island by a helicopter from the ship.

BOXER was decommissioned 1 December 1969, and stricken from the Navy List. She was sold for scrapping on 13 March 1971.

BOXER received eight battle stars for her service off Korea.

Click here to get a view of the deployments of USS BOXER


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USS BOXER Video Gallery:




Click the thumbnail to view the video
Footage by LCDR Charles D. Larson, USS BOXER.

The video consists of scenes from the USS BOXER during her Western Pacific Cruise from June 1955 - February 1956. Footage includes:

  • - Port visit to Yokosuka, Japan
  • - VF-144 F9F-5 Cougars ("404" and "414") landing
  • - Underway replenishment (UNREP) with USS TOLOVANA (AO 64) and USS HARRY E. HUBBARD (DD 748)
  • - VC-61 F9F-6P Cougar take-offs and landings
  • - VF-142 F9F-6 Cougars
  • - VC-11 AD-4 and VC-35 AD-5N Skyraiders
  • - Flight deck operations
  • - etc.







Click the thumbnail to view the video
Footage by LCDR Charles D. Larson, USS BOXER.

The video consists of scenes of flight operations aboard USS BOXER during her Western Pacific Cruise from June 1955 - February 1956.


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USS BOXER Image Gallery:



Sours: https://www.navysite.de/cv/cv21.htm

Boxer history uss

USS Boxer (CV / CVA / CVS 21 - LPH 4):
 
The fifth Boxer (CV 21) was launched 14 December 1944 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co. Newport News, Va.; sponsored by Miss Ruth D. Overton daughter of the Senator from Louisiana and commissioned 16 April 1945, Captain D. F. Smith in command.

Completed too late to take part in World War II, Boxer joined the Pacific Fleet at San Diego in August 1945. From September 1945 to 23 August 1946 she operated out of Guam as flagship of TF 77 in the western Pacific. During this tour she visited Japan, Okinawa, the Philippines and China. She returned to San Francisco 10 September 1946 and operated off the west coast engaged in normal peacetime duty until departing for the Far East 11 January 1950. After service with the 7th Fleet in the Far East during the first half of 1950, she returned to San Diego, arriving 25 June.

With the outbreak of the Korean conflict she was pressed into service to carry planes to the fighting. On 23 July 1950 she completed a record crossing of the Pacific from Alameda, Calif., to Yokosuka, Japan, in 8 days, carrying 145 P-51 Mustang and six L-5 aircraft for the Air Force, 19 Navy planes, 1,012 troops and 2,000 tons of supplies. On her return trip (27 July-4 August), she cut the record to 7 days, 10 hours, and 36 minutes. After fast repairs she departed for the Far East 24 August, this time to join TF 77 in giving air support to the troops. Her planes supported the landing at Inchon (15 September 1950) and other ground action until November, when she departed for the west coast and overhaul.

Boxer departed San Diego for her second Korean tour 2 March 1951. Again she operated with TF 77 supporting the ground troops. On 29 March, Carrier Air Wing 101 composed of Naval Reserve squadrons called to active duty from Dallas, Tex.; Glenview, Ill.; Memphis, Tenn.; and, Olathe, Kans. flew its first combat mission from Boxer, the first carrier strikes by Naval Reserve units against North Korean forces. She returned to San Francisco 24 October 1951.

Sailing 8 February 1952 for her third tour in Korea, Boxer again served with TF 77. On 23 June, 35 AD Skyraiders and 35 F-9F2 Panther jets from Boxer, USS Princeton (CV 37) and USS Philippine Sea (CV 47), joined Air Force Thunderjets in an attack on the heavily defended hydroelectric power plant at Suiho, North Korea, the fourth largest such facility in the world. The plant was completely knocked out. The raid was part of a two-day aerial offensive against North Korea's 13 major power plants.

On 5 August 1952, Boxer had nine men killed and two seriously injured in a fire which swept the hangar deck. After emergency repairs at Yokosuka, Japan (11-23 August), Boxer returned to duty off Korea. She arrived at San Francisco 25 September and underwent repairs until March 1953.

The carrier departed for the Far East 30 March 1953 and went into action a month later. She took part in the final actions of the Korean conflict and remained in Asiatic waters until November.

Boxer was reclassified CVA-21 on 1 October 1952 and CVS-21 on 1 February 1956.

On 2 October 1958, the Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, announced the formation of a new amphibious squadron, composed of Boxer and for LSDs equipped with helicopter platforms, which would provide a highly mobile unit capable of employing Marine Corps helicopters squadrons and combat troops in the fast-landing concept of vertical envelopment. The first permanent Marine Aviation Detachment afloat was activated on board Boxer on 10 November to provide supply, maintenance, and flight deck control functions necessary to support the Marine helicopter squadrons and troops. The ship was reclassified as LPH 4 on 30 January 1959.

Boxer and two LSDs arrived off the coast of Hispanola on 29 August 1964 to provide medical aid and helicopter evacuation services to people in areas of Haiti and the Dominican Republic badly damaged by Hurricane Cleo. Boxer returned to the Dominican Republic on 27 April 1965, sending her Marines ashore while the embarked HMM-264 began an airlift in which over 1,000 U.S. nationals were evacuated to the naval task force off shore as a revolt in the country threatened their safety.

Boxer also participated in the U.S. space program. On 26 February 1966, the first unmanned spacecraft of the Apollo series, fired into suborbital flight by a Saturn 1B rocket from Cape Kennedy, Fla., was recovered in the southeast Atlantic Ocean, 200 miles east of Ascension Island by a helicopter from the ship.

Boxer was decommissioned 1 December 1969, and stricken from the Navy List. She was sold for scrapping on 13 March 1971.

Boxer received eight battle stars for her service off Korea.

source: US Navy

- - - - -

another history:


The ship was one of the "long-hull" designs of the class, which had begun production after March 1943. This "long hull" variant involved lengthening the bow above the waterline into a "clipper" form. The increased rake and flare provided deck space for two quadruple 40 mm mounts; these units also had the flight deck slightly shortened forward to provide better arcs of fire. Of the Essex-class ships laid down after 1942, only Bon Homme Richard followed the original "short bow" design. The later ships have been variously referred to as the "long-bow units", the "long-hull group", or the "Ticonderoga class". However, the U.S. Navy never maintained any institutional distinction between the long-hull and short-hull members of the Essex class, and postwar refits and upgrades were applied to both groups equally.

Like other "long-hull" Essex-class carriers, Boxer had a displacement of 27,100 tonnes (26,700 long tons; 29,900 short tons). She had an overall length of 888 feet (271 m), a beam of 93 feet (28 m) and a draft of 28 feet (8.5 m). The ship was powered by eight 600 psi Babcock & Wilcox boilers, and Westinghouse geared steam turbines that developed 150,000 shaft horsepower (110,000 kW) that turned four propellers. Like other Essex-class carriers, she had a maximum speed of 33 knots (61 km/h; 38 mph). The ship had a total crew complement of 3,448. Like other Essex-class ships, she could be armed with 12 5-inch (127 mm)/38 caliber guns arrayed in four pairs and four single emplacements, as well as eight quadruple Bofors 40 mm guns and 46 Oerlikon 20 mm cannons. However, unlike her sisters, Boxer was armed instead with 72 40 mm guns and 35 20 mm cannons.

Her keel was laid on 13 September 1943 by the Newport News Shipbuilding Company at its facility in Newport News, Virginia. She was the fifth ship of the US Navy to be named Boxer, after HMS Boxer, which had been captured by the U.S. during the War of 1812. The last ship to bear the name had been a training ship in 1905. The new carrier was launched on 14 December 1944 and she was christened by Ruth D. Overton, the daughter of U.S. Senator John H. Overton. The ship's cost is estimated at $68,000,000 to $78,000,000.


Service history:

Boxer was commissioned on 16 April 1945 under the command of Captain D. F. Smith. She subsequently began sea trials and a shakedown cruise. Before these were complete, the Empire of Japan surrendered on V-J Day, marking the end of World War II before Boxer could participate. She joined the Pacific Fleet at San Diego in August 1945 and the next month she steamed for Guam, becoming the flagship of Task Force 77, a position she held until 23 August 1946. During this tour, she visited Japan, Okinawa, the Philippines, and China.

She returned to San Francisco on 10 September 1946, embarked Carrier Air Group 19 flying the Grumman F8F Bearcat fighter. With this complement, Boxer began a series of peacetime patrols and training missions off the coast of California during a relatively uneventful period during 1947. In spite of manning difficulties brought on by the demobilization of the US military after World War II, Boxer remained active in Pacific readiness drills around the West Coast and Hawaii. In 1948, she conducted a number of short cruises with US Navy Reserve personnel. On 10 March 1948, a North American FJ-1 Fury launched from Boxer, the first such launch of an all-jet aircraft from an American carrier, which allowed subsequent tests of jet aircraft carrier doctrine. For the remainder of 1948 and 1949, she participated in numerous battle drills and acted as a training carrier for jet aircraft pilots.

She was dispatched to the Far East on another tour on 11 January 1950. She joined the 7th Fleet in the region, making a goodwill visit to South Korea and entertaining South Korean president Syngman Rhee and his wife Franziska Donner. and at the end of the tour returned to San Diego on 25 June 1950, the same day as the outbreak of the Korean War. At the time, she was overdue for a maintenance overhaul, but she did not have time to complete it before being dispatched again.

Korean War:
With the outbreak of the Korean War, the U.S. forces in the Far East had an urgent need for supplies and aircraft. The only aircraft carriers near Korea were USS Valley Forge and HMS Triumph. Boxer was ordered into service to ferry aircraft from California to the fighting on the Korean Peninsula. She made a record-breaking crossing of the Pacific Ocean, leaving Alameda, California on 14 July 1950 and arriving at Yokosuka, Japan on 23 July, a trip of 8 days and 7 hours. She carried one hundred forty-five North American P-51 Mustangs and six Stinson L-5 Sentinels of the United States Air Force destined for the Far East Air Force as well as 19 Navy aircraft, 1,012 Air Force support personnel, and 2,000 tonnes (2,000 long tons; 2,200 short tons) of supplies for the United Nations troops fighting the North Korean invasion of South Korea, including crucially needed spare parts and ordnance. Much of this equipment had been taken from Air National Guard units in the United States because of a general shortage of materiel. She began her return trip from Yokosuka on 27 July and arrived back in California on 4 August, for a trip of 7 days, 10 hours and 36 minutes, again breaking the record for a trans-Pacific cruise. She carried no jet aircraft, though, because they were deemed too fuel inefficient for the initial defense mission in Korea. By the time Boxer arrived in Korea, the UN forces had established superiority in the air and sea.

After rapid repairs in California, Boxer embarked Carrier Air Group 2, flying the Vought F4U Corsair propeller driven fighter-bomber, and departed again for Korea on 24 August, this time in a combat role. She had 110 aircraft aboard, intended to complement the hundreds of aircraft already operating in Korea. En route to the peninsula, the carrier narrowly avoided Typhoon Kezia which slowed her trip. She was the fourth aircraft carrier to arrive in Korea to participate in the war, after Triumph and Valley Forge had arrived in June and USS Philippine Sea followed in early August. She arrived too late to participate in the Battle of Pusan Perimeter, but instead she was ordered to join a flotilla of 230 US ships which would participate in Operation Chromite, the UN counterattack at Inchon. On 15 September, she supported the landings by sending her aircraft in a close air support role, blocking North Korean reinforcements and communication to prevent them from countering the attack. However, early in the operation, her propulsion system was damaged when a reduction gear in the ship's engine broke, a casualty of her overdue maintenance. The ship's engineers worked around the problem to keep the carrier in operation, but she was limited to 26 knots.

She continued this role as the UN troops recaptured Seoul days later. Boxer continued this support as UN troops advanced north and into North Korea, but departed for the United States on 11 November for refit and overhaul. US military commanders believed the war in Korea was over, and had ordered a number of other carriers out of the area and were subsequently under-prepared at the beginning of the Chosin Reservoir Campaign when the Chinese People's Liberation Army entered the war against the UN. Battlefield commanders requested Boxer return to Korea as soon as possible, but she did not immediately return as commanders feared it might reduce the Navy's ability to respond if another conflict or emergency broke out elsewhere.

Boxer's propulsion problems required extensive repair so she returned to San Diego to conduct them. Upon arrival, she offloaded Air Group 2, which then embarked for Korea again aboard Valley Forge. After a repair and refit in California, Boxer was prepared for a second tour in Korea. She embarked Carrier Air Group 101. The group was composed of Navy Reserve squadrons from Dallas, Texas, Glenview, Illinois, Memphis, Tennessee and Olathe, Kansas, and most of its pilots were reservists who had been called to active duty. She rejoined Task Force 77, and began operations in Korea on 29 March 1951, and her squadrons were the first Naval Reserve pilots to launch strikes in Korea. Most of these missions were airstrikes against Chinese ground forces along the 38th parallel, and this duty lasted until 24 October 1951. During this time, the carrier operated around "Point Oboe", an area 125 miles (201 km) off the coast of Wonsan. They would withdraw another 50 miles (80 km) east when they needed replenishment or refueling. A large destroyer screen protected the carriers, though MiG-15 attacks against them did not occur.

After another period of rest and refits, Boxer departed California 8 February 1952 for her third tour in Korea, with Carrier Air Group 2 embarked, consisting of F9F in VF-24, F4U in VF 63 and VF-64, and AD in VF-65. Rejoining Task Force 77, her missions during this tour consisted primarily of strategic bombing against targets in North Korea, as the front lines in the war had largely solidified along the 38th Parallel. On 23 and 24 June, her planes conducted strikes against the Sui-ho hydro-electric complex in conjunction with Princeton, Bon Homme Richard and Philippine Sea.

On 5 August 1952, a fire broke out on the hangar deck of Boxer at 05:30 when a fuel tank of an aircraft caught fire while the ship was conducting combat operations in the Sea of Japan. The fire raged on the carrier's hangar deck for 4-5 hours before being extinguished. The final total of casualties was 8 dead, 1 missing, 1 critically injured, 1 seriously burned and some 70 overcome by smoke. Of the 63 who had gone over the side, all were rescued and returned to the ship. Eighteen aircraft, mostly Grumman F9F-2 Panthers, were damaged or destroyed. She steamed for Yokosuka for emergency repairs from 11 to 23 August. She returned to the Korean theatre, and from 28 August to 2 September she tested a new weapons system, with six radio guided Grumman F6F Hellcats loaded with 1,000-pound (450 kg) bombs guided to targets, resulting in two hits and one near miss. They are considered to be the first guided missiles to be launched from a carrier in combat. On 1 September her aircraft also took part in a large bombing mission of an oil refinery near Aoji, on the Manchurian border. She returned to San Francisco for more extensive repairs on 25 September. In October 1952, she was re-designated CVA-21, denoting an "attack aircraft carrier."

Following extensive repairs, she steamed for Korea again on 30 March 1953, and resumed operations a month later with her Corsairs embarked. Her missions around this time were generally strategic bombing missions, however the effectiveness of these final missions were mixed, with some failing to achieve strategic results. She also provided close air support for UN troops for the final weeks of the war before an armistice was reached at Panmunjom in July 1953, ending major combat operations in Korea. During this time, the two sides often conducted costly attacks in order to strengthen their bargaining positions at the negotiating table. Boxer remained in Korean waters until November 1953. She received eight battle stars for her service in Korea.

In 1951 she appears in the film Submarine Command, with William Bendix and William Holden, then carrying a complement of helicopters.

Post-Korea:
Following the Korean War, Boxer returned to the United States. She conducted a tour of the Pacific throughout 1954 which was relatively uneventful, followed by a rest in the United States and another tour in the Pacific in late 1955 and early 1956, which was similarly uneventful.

She was converted to an anti-submarine warfare carrier in early 1956, re-designated CVS-21. She completed another tour of the western Pacific in late 1956 and early 1957, which was her tenth and final deployment to the area. In late 1957, the navy began experimenting with the concept of a carrier operating entirely with attack helicopters, and Boxer was used to test the concept.

In 1958, Boxer was the flagship during Operation Hardtack, a series of nuclear weapons tests in the central Pacific. Later that year, she was transferred to the Atlantic Fleet, and became part of a new amphibious assault squadron with four Landing Ship Tank vessels equipped with helicopter platforms. The experimental concept would allow for rapid deployment of US Marine Corps personnel and helicopter squadrons. For the remainder of 1958 elements of this force were organized aboard Boxer and she was reclassified LPH-4, denoting a "Landing Platform Helicopter", on 30 January 1959.

For the next 10 years, Boxer operated mainly out of the Caribbean as an amphibious assault carrier. During this duty, she was on station during the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. In 1964, she undertook her first tour to the Mediterranean when she took part in Operation Steel Pike, the largest amphibious exercise in history.

With two LSD ships, Boxer was dispatched to Hispaniola on 29 August 1964 on a humanitarian mission to aid Haiti and the Dominican Republic whose infrastructure had been damaged by Hurricane Cleo. The ships provided medical aid and helped to evacuate civilians displaced by the storm. On 27 April 1965 Boxer returned to the Dominican Republic with Helicopter Squadron 264 and a complement of Marines. They evacuated about 1,000 US nationals from the country in the wake of a revolution in the country. It was a part of Operation Powerpack which would eventually see the US occupation of that country. Later in 1965, she was used as a transport vessel for the Vietnam War. The carrier transported 200 helicopters of the US Army's 1st Cavalry Division to South Vietnam. She made a second trip to Vietnam in early 1966 when she transported Marine Corps aircraft to South Vietnam. However, she did not participate in combat operations during that war.

On 26 February 1966, Boxer recovered AS-201, an unmanned test flight of the Apollo program which had launched from Cape Kennedy, Florida aboard a Saturn 1B rocket. The capsule had landed 200 miles (320 km) east of Ascension Island and one of Boxer's helicopters picked it up. From 16-17 March 1966, Boxer was the designated Atlantic prime recovery ship for Gemini 8, although USS Leonard F. Mason recovered the spacecraft and two crewmen after it encountered problems.

She was decommissioned on 1 December 1969 after 25 years of service, and she was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register. She was sold for scrap on 13 March 1971 and finally scrapped at Kearny, New Jersey.

source: wikipedia
Sours: https://www.seaforces.org/usnships/cv/CV-21-USS-Boxer.htm
US Navy Amphibious Assault Ship - USS Boxer (LHD-4) in Action - 2017..!!

History of the USS Boxer and Its Involvement in the Korean War

Conceived in the 1920s and early 1930s, the US Navy's Lexington- and Yorktown-class aircraft carriers were built to fit within the restrictions set forth by the Washington Naval Treaty. This placed limitations on the tonnage of different types of warships as well as capped each signatory’s overall tonnage. These types of restrictions were continued through the 1930 London Naval Treaty. As global tensions rose, Japan and Italy left the agreement in 1936. With the end of the treaty system, the US Navy began developing a design for a new, larger class of aircraft carriers and one which utilized the lessons learned from the Yorktown-class. The resulting type was wider and longer as well as incorporated a deck-edge elevator system. This had been employed earlier on USS Wasp (CV-7). In addition to carrying a larger air group, the new class mounted a greatly enlarged anti-aircraft armament. The lead ship, USS Essex (CV-9), was laid down on April 28, 1941.

With the US entry into World War II after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Essex-class became the US Navy's standard design for fleet carriers. The first four ships after Essex followed the type's initial design. In early 1943, the US Navy made changes to enhance future vessels. The most noticeable of these was the lengthening the bow to a clipper design which allowed for the addition of two quadruple 40 mm mounts. Other changes included moving the combat information center below the armored deck, installation of improved aviation fuel and ventilation systems, a second catapult on the flight deck, and an additional fire control director. Though known as the "long-hull" Essex-class or Ticonderoga-class by some, the US Navy made no distinction between these and the earlier Essex-class ships.

USS Boxer (CV-21) Construction

The first ship to move forward with the revised Essex-class design was USS Hancock (CV-14) which was later renamed Ticonderoga. It was followed by several others including USS Boxer (CV-21). Laid down on September 13, 1943, the construction of Boxer began at Newport News Shipbuilding and rapidly moved forward. Named for HMS Boxer which had been captured by the US Navy during the War of 1812, the new carrier slid into the water on December 14, 1944, with Ruth D. Overton, daughter of Senator John H. Overton, serving as sponsor. Work continued and Boxer entered commission on April 16, 1945, with Captain D.F. Smith in command.

Early Service

Departing Norfolk, Boxer commenced shakedown and training operations in preparation for use in the Pacific Theater of World War II. As these initiatives were concluding, the conflict ended with Japan asking for a cessation of hostilities. Dispatched to the Pacific in August 1945, Boxer arrived at San Diego before departing for Guam the following month. Reaching that island, it became the flagship of Task Force 77. Supporting the occupation of Japan, the carrier remained abroad until August 1946 and also made calls in Okinawa, China, and the Philippines. Returning to San Francisco, Boxer embarked Carrier Air Group 19 which flew the new Grumman F8F Bearcat. As one of the US Navy's newest carriers, Boxer remained in commission as the service downsized from its wartime levels.

After conducting peacetime activities off California in 1947, the following year saw Boxer employed in jet aircraft testing. In this role, it launched the first jet fighter, a North American FJ-1 Fury, to fly from an American carrier on March 10. After spending two years employed in maneuvers and training jet pilots, Boxer departed for the Far East in January 1950. Making goodwill visits around the region as part of the 7th Fleet, the carrier also entertained South Korean President Syngman Rhee. Due for a maintenance overhaul, Boxer returned to San Diego on June 25 just as the Korean War was beginning.

Korean War

Due to the urgency of the situation, Boxer's overhaul was postponed and the carrier was quickly employed to ferry aircraft to the war zone. Embarking 145 North American P-51 Mustangs and other aircraft and supplies, the carrier departed Alameda, CA on July 14 and set a trans-Pacific speed record by reaching Japan in eight days, seven hours. Another record was set in early August when Boxer made a second ferry trip. Returning to California, the carrier received cursory maintenance before embarking the Chance-Vought F4U Corsairs of Carrier Air Group 2. Sailing for Korea in a combat role, Boxer arrived and received orders to join the fleet gathering to support the landings at Inchon. 

Operating off Inchon in September, Boxer's aircraft provided close support to the troops ashore as they drove inland and re-captured Seoul. While performing this mission, the carrier was stricken when one of its reduction gears failed. Caused due to postponed maintenance on the vessel, it limited the carrier's speed to 26 knots. On November 11, Boxer received orders to sail for the United States to make repairs. These were conducted at San Diego and the carrier was able to resume combat operations after embarking Carrier Air Group 101. Operating from Point Oboe, approximately 125 miles east of Wonsan, Boxer's aircraft struck targets along the 38th Parallel between March and October 1951. 

Refitting in the fall of 1951, Boxer again sailed for Korea the following February with the Grumman F9F Panthers of Carrier Air Group 2 aboard. Serving in Task Force 77, the carrier's planes conducted strategic strikes across North Korea. During this deployment, tragedy struck the ship on August 5 when an aircraft's fuel tank caught fire. Quickly spreading through the hanger deck, it took over four hours to contain and killed eight. Repaired at Yokosuka, Boxer re-entered combat operations later that month. Shortly after returning, the carrier tested a new weapons system that used radio-controlled Grumman F6F Hellcats as flying bombs. Re-designated as an attack aircraft carrier (CVA-21) in October 1952, Boxer underwent an extensive overhaul that winter before making a final Korean deployment between March and November 1953.

A Transition

Following the end of the conflict, Boxer made a series of cruises in the Pacific between 1954 and 1956. Re-designated an anti-submarine carrier (CVS-21) in early 1956, it made a final Pacific deployment late that year and into 1957. Returning home, Boxer was selected to take part in a US Navy experiment that sought to have a carrier solely employ attack helicopters. Moved to the Atlantic in 1958, Boxer operated with an experimental force intended to support the rapid deployment of US Marines. This saw it again re-designated on January 30, 1959, this time as a landing platform helicopter (LPH-4). Largely operating in the Caribbean, Boxer supported American efforts during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 as well as used its new capabilities to aid efforts in Haiti and the Dominican Republic later in the decade.

With the US entry into the Vietnam War in 1965, Boxer reprised its ferry role by carrying 200 helicopters belonging to the US Army's 1st Cavalry Division to South Vietnam. A second trip was made the following year. Returning to the Atlantic, Boxer assisted NASA in early 1966 when it recovered an unmanned Apollo test capsule (AS-201) in February and served as the primary recovery ship for Gemini 8 in March. Over the next three years, Boxer continued in its amphibious support role until being decommissioned on December 1, 1969. Removed from the Naval Vessel Register, it was sold for scrap on March 13, 1971.    

At a Glance

  • Nation: United States
  • Type: Aircraft Carrier
  • Shipyard: Newport New Shipbuilding
  • Laid Down: September 13, 1943
  • Launched: December 4, 1944
  • Commissioned: April 16, 1945
  • Fate: Sold for scrap, February 1971

Specifications

  • Displacement: 27,100 tons
  • Length: 888 ft.
  • Beam: 93 ft.
  • Draft: 28 ft., 7 in.
  • Propulsion: 8 × boilers, 4 × Westinghouse geared steam turbines, 4 × shafts
  • Speed: 33 knots
  • Complement: 3,448 men

Armament

  • 4 × twin 5 inch 38 caliber guns
  • 4 × single 5 inch 38 caliber guns
  • 8 × quadruple 40 mm 56 caliber guns
  • 46 × single 20 mm 78 caliber guns

Aircraft

Selected Sources

Sours: https://www.thoughtco.com/korean-war-uss-boxer-cv-21-2360358

You will also be interested:

The CV-21 USS Boxer is a 27,100-ton aircraft carrier of the Essex class, and was commissioned in April of 1945. The initial training was not completed until after World War II ended, but she was on active duty in the Pacific after the war. In all, there were 10 deployments of the USS Boxer to the Western Pacific between 1945 and 1957.

Korean War

In June of 1950, the USS Boxer had just recently returned from one such deployment and then the Korean War broke out. She was used to carry personnel and planes from the Navy and Air Force into the war zone, and was then put into combat service during September and October of that year.

After three additional Korean War deployments between 1951 and 1953, the USS Boxer was assigned to serve with the Seventh Fleet as an attack carrier for two cruises. In early 1956 she was converted into an anti-submarine warfare vessel and made her final deployment to the Western Pacific as such.

Final Days

USS Boxer was used in 1957 as part of an experimental assault helicopter ship, and then became the flagship for Operation Hardtack in 1958. She then went on to become part of the Atlantic Fleet and operated as part of the U.S. amphibious warfare capabilities through the next decade. After a short stint in Vietnam, she was decommissioned in 1969 and sold for scrapping in 1971.

Sours: https://www.hullnumber.com/CV-21


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